George A. Huttlin has been an adjunct member of the PGCC faculty since 1998. From 1975 to 1997 he was a physicist at the Army Research Laboratory and Harry Diamond Laboratories, where he worked in high-voltage pulsed power, high-power microwave generation, and nuclear-radiation-effects simulation. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Notre Dame where he did research on polarization effects in nuclear reactions. A native of Philadelphia, his B.A. is from La Salle University. Besides teaching, his present interests include non-linear effects, chaos, and quantum mechanics. For fun he writes computer programs to solve geometric puzzles, constructs mechanical puzzles, and performs semi-professionally as a percussionist with various musical groups.


Physics 102 is the sequal to Physics 101. The course begins with a review of Physics 101 as we introduce oscillations and waves. Next we encounter electricity, magnetism, and electromagnetic waves. The semester ends with optics, which, in a sense, is the culmination of electromagnetic theory. Specific topics include:

  • Harmonic Motion
  • Masses on Springs
  • Pendulums
  • Wave Motion
  • Interference
  • Resonance and Musical Instruments
  • Sound Intensity
  • Doppler Shift and Sonic Boom
  • Electric Charge
  • Coulomb's Law
  • Electric Field
  • Gauss' Law
  • Electric Potential
  • Capacitance
  • Dielectric Materials
  • Electric Current
  • Ohm's Law (resistivity and resistance)
  • Electric Circuits (Kirchoff's Laws)
  • Magnetic Field
  • Lorentz Force
  • Faraday's (Lenz) Law
  • Inductance
  • Maxwell's Equations
  • Electromagnetic Waves
  • Law of Reflection
  • Law of Refraction
  • Mirrors
  • Lenses
  • Systems of Mirrors and Lenses
  • Optical Devices
  • Dispersion
  • Diffraction (Huygens' Principle)
  • Single and Multiple Slits (Young's Experiment)
  • Optical Interference
  • Plane Polarization

Prerequisites for success in this course include courses in elementary algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and a non-calculus introduction to classical mechanics. Specifically, the student should have a working familiarity with:

  • Linear Equations
  • Quadratic Equations
  • Simultaneous Equations
  • Graphical Analysis
  • Vectors
  • Newton's Laws
  • Energy
  • Momentum