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Goedele Gulikers

Writing (check this page soon for updated links)

    Plagiarism and Academic Integrity

    Different Types of Writing:

    Timed Writing
    Paragraph and Essay Writing
    Journal Writing
    Research Writing

    Plagiarism and Academic Integrity

Academic dishonesty, including cheating, fabrication of information, facilitating academic dishonesty will not be tolerated. You can read about this in the Student Handbook under Policies and Regulations

The Writing Center at Indiana University gives a clear explanation and examples about plagiarism, and the correct way to paraphrase.

    Different Types of Writing:

    Timed Writing

This type of writing is used to practice writing answer paragraphs to exam questions. Since the time for writing is limited, we call this "timed writing". The focus of this kind of writing is on brainstorming ideas, organizing ideas, and using appropriate connectors to show your understanding of the course material.

When practicing timed writing paragraphs, I will comment on the following three parts:
content, format, and mechanics (grammar and spelling).


    Paragraph and Essay Writing
    Journal Writing

Journal writing is used to practice writing without having to worry about accuracy. Your journal should be a place where you can record ideas and feelings, analyze the things you work on in your writing class, and analyze your own writing process. This kind of writing practice will help you to write more quickly and fluently. Since journal writing is not graded, it is also an excellent opportunity to practice different styles and new vocabulary.

There are several important points to remember about your journal:
- you will be expected to make entries in your journal at least three times per week.
- the contents of your journal is primarily for you, not for me. I will write comments, and maybe ask questions, but I will not correct your grammar or writing style.
- always allow yourself enough time. Rather than writing just a few sentences, take the time to express yourself thoroughly.

Read through the following examples to see what types of entries you can make in your journal.

1. Personal Response Entry
In this type of entry you write your personal reaction to something. Your entry should discuss your opinions and feelings about something you have read, or watched, or about something we have discussed in class. Below are some examples of the questions you might keep in mind when writing this type of entry:
    How did you feel about reading ....?
    Do you agree or disagree with ....?
    Is .... new for you, or do you have experience with it?
    How does .... relate to your experience?
    Do you enjoy this type of reading/project/discussion? Explain why or why not.

2. Self-Observation Entry
In this type of entry you are asked to analyze your own process of learning to improve your writing. Below are some examples of the questions you might keep in mind when writing this type of entry:
    What steps did you go through in completing this writing assignment?
    Was your writing process effective, or are there things you would do differently next time?
    Think back to earlier writing. What differences do you see in your writing then versus now?
    Explain how you felt about working with your classmates to revise your writing. Why is this process helpful? difficult? interesting?

3. Summary Entry

4. Open Entry

5. Workshop Entry


    Research Writing

 

Last modified: August 2003