Programs: Microsoft Windows 2000: Lesson 3


Lesson 3: In this lesson we will learn the common elements of the Windows 2000 window.
By the end of this tutorial, you will:
  • Understand Microsoft Windows 2000imgBoxPro.gif (7703 bytes)
  • Be able to use the mouse and keyboard
  • Understand the Desktop and Start Menu
  • Understand how to use the window
  • Be able to navigate through dialog boxes
  • Learn how to use the Help system
  • Manage disks and files
  • Create and utilize folders
  • Modify files
  • Explore the Internet
  • Learn how to properly shut-down Windows
Lesson 3: The Window
Figure 3.1 Multitasking
Multitasking

What is Multitasking?

Multitasking allows the user to do many things at once. You do this all the time in life: talking on the phone, while doing homework, and eating dinner. In Windows you can complete a Word document, while listening to music and searching the Internet, all at the same time. This is only one example of the countless ways one can improve productivity while multitasking.
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The Active Window

The Active Window is the window with the highlighted title bar and is generally the window that is on top of all the others. Click to have a red box appear around the active window. Click again to make it disappear.
Multitasking allows the user to make “piles” of windows.

To make an inactive window active, simply click on the actual taskbar, click on the window’s button on the taskbar, or use Alt + Tab to move between windows.
Figure 3.2 Opening Up a Window
Opening Up a Window

Getting in a Window

Figure 3.2 demonstrates how to double-click an icon to view a window.   In this example, we'll open the My Computer window.
Figure 3.3 My Computer: A Sample Window
My Computer: A Sample Window

Parts of a Typical Window

The remainder of this section focuses on the various parts of a standard Microsoft Windows 2000 window.

It is important to realize that it does not matter which window we use for purposes of this example; a standardized interface is what unites all elements of the Microsoft Windows operating systems.
Figure 3.4 Window Parts: Title Bar
Windows Parts: Title Bar

Highlighted Title Bar

When the Title Bar is active it will be a color (such as this default blue), but during multitasking, a non-active window will appear a faded gray.
Figure 3.5 Windows Parts: Buttons
Windows Parts: Button

Where are these buttons found?

The buttons are found on right hand side of the title bar.
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Minimize Button

This button will allow you to put aside the window, taking it off the desktop and leaves it only as a button on the taskbar. The window remains in the computer’s memory.
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Maximize Button

When you are viewing a window that does not take up the full dimensions of the screen, but would like it to do so, click on this button.  The window automatically resizes to fill the entire screen.
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Restore Button

If you then decide you do not want the window to take up the entire screen, (often during multitasking), simply click the restore button to return the window to its previous size.
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Close Button

This button will cause you to be exited from the window and the application (generally a program) will be removed from the current memory. To view it again, you must reopen the application.
Figure 3.6 Moving Windows
Moving Windows

Making the Move

Sometimes you may wish to relocate a window on your screen.  This can be extremely helpful when you are multitasking with a wide variety of windows.   This process will allow you to move an active window.

You can only move a window if it is not already maximized to a full screen view.

It is important to left-click and hold the mouse down.  If you let go, the window will not be able to be moved.  Once you let go, the window will be relocated. You can repeat this process until you have placed the window where you desire.
Figure 3.7 Resizing Windows
Resizing Windows

Picking a Size

Sometimes you may wish to change the size a window on your screen.   This can be extremely helpful when you are multitasking with a wide variety of windows.  This process will allow you to resize an active window, making the window either bigger or smaller.

You can only resize a window if it is not already maximized to a full screen view.

Dragging in towards the center of the window will make it smaller.

Dragging out from center of window will make it larger.

Vertical Resizing

By left-clicking and holding the top or bottom edge of a window, one can make the window longer by pulling out or shorter by pulling in with the mouse.

Horizontal Resizing

By left-clicking and holding the right or left edge of a window, one can make the window longer by pulling out or shorter by pulling in with the mouse.

Diagonal Resizing

By left-clicking and holding any corner of a window, one can make the change the vertical and horizontal dimensions at once.  Again, pulling out will enlarge the window and pulling in will reduce the size of the window.
Figure 3.8 Windows Parts: Menu Bar
Windows Parts: Menu Bar

Where is it found?

The Menu Bar  is found directly below the Title Bar.
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Shortcut

The menus are revealed by clicking on the words or by pressing the ALT key in combination with the underlined letter. For example, to open the File menu, one could click on the word “File” or simply press
ALT + F.
Figure 3.8 Pull-Down Menus
Pull-Down Menus

What is a Pull-Down menu?

As you can see, selecting File causes a new set of options to appear.

This is called a Pull-Down Menu, since this set of options, or menu, is 'pulled down' from beneath the depressed word File.
Figure 3.9 Pull-Down Menu Tricks
Pull-Down Menu Tricks

Shortcut

One can use the mouse to click on the desired option or simply follow the keystroke directions to the right of the desired option.

For example, to create a new document one could either click the word with the mouse or simply press CTRL + N on the keyboard.  Note: the red box is only meant to focus your attention, it does not actually appear on your screen.
Figure 3.10 Windows Parts: Toolbars
Windows Parts: Toolbars

Where is it found?

Toolbars are found directly below the menu bar.
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Another Shortcut

By clicking on the icons of the toolbar, one does not need to use the pull down menus.

However, it is important to note that not all options found in the pull-down menus can be found on the toolbar.
Figure 3.11 Windows Parts: Scroll Bars
Windows Parts: Scroll Bars

Where are they located?

These bars can be found on the right of the window, as well as on the bottom of the window.
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What is the purpose of them?

Moving the bar up or down, left or right, allows the user to display more of the window, that does not fit on the current screen.
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Two ways to move the bars

One can either click on the actual arrows, or, one can click and hold the bar while dragging it in the desired direction.

Self Graded Review Quiz

1.  What is the correct order of display for the following buttons?
A. minimize button, restore and maximize button, close button
B. maximize and minimize button, restore button, close button
C. close button, restore and maximize button, minimize button
D. minimize button, close button, restore and maximize button

2.  The bar at the bottom of a window is called:
A. toolbar
B. scroll bar
C. status bar
D. menu bar

3.  What is not a step in moving a window?
A. Click on the titlebar on desktop.
B. Drag the titlebar to desired position.
C. Right click and select paste.
D. All of the above are steps.

4.  How can you tell which is the active window?
A. The window constantly blinks.
B. The window is larger than the other windows on the desktop.
C. The window is generally on top of all the other windows.
D. The window will be highlighted in a different color.

5.  How can you tell when the Title Bar is active?
A. It will be colored or highlighted (Default color is blue).
B. The highlighted bar will flash.
C. a and b.
D. none of the above.

6.  Often used during multitasking, this button is used to restore a window to its previous size:
    

7.  This button allows you to put aside a Window and leaves it only as a bar on the task bar:
    

8.  This button causes you to close a Window and the program will be removed from the current memory:
    

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Programs: Microsoft Windows 2000: Lesson 3