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Microsoft Windows 2000 Teacher’s Lecture Notes
MICROSOFT WINDOWS 2000 LECTURER SCRIPT
Materials to be read aloud to your students will be in a regular font, such as this.
Actions to be completed by you will be explained in an italicized font, such as this.
(click) indicates you need to click the mouse, press the down key,
space bar or enter key to prompt the next action to occur.
Please read this screen aloud to your students.
Please read this screen aloud to your students.
Please read this screen aloud to your students.
This chapter will prepare you to work with all Microsoft Windows 2000 based applications.  Learning how to use Windows is as essential as learning to read a book. 

Think about when you were a little kid.  Learning to read was a daunting task, but once you learned how to read one book, you were able to try reading another.   Then you felt braver and tried to read harder books; soon you had no difficultly reading an unfamiliar book from cover to cover.

Microsoft Windows is the same way.  At first this might seems like a lot to learn at once, but as time goes on it will become second nature to you.  Once you have mastered Windows, all other Windows-based programs will be easier to learn at a rapid pace.  All the other Microsoft programs you will be learning. share many basic elements covered in this section.
In this lesson we will learn the background and history of Microsoft Windows 2000.

Each new version of Windows has improved upon the previous version.
The next slide will describe the history of Windows 2000. 
The history of Windows 2000 begins with the creation of Windows 95 which was intended for home computers. (click)
At the same time, Microsoft developed Windows NT 4.0 as the network version counterpart. (click)
Windows 98 was an improved version of Windows 95, and contained features reflecting the onset of the internet age.  (click)
This version came packaged with Microsoft Internet Explorer and broke down the barrier between the home PC and the web.  There were, however, several small security issues.
To rectify these issues, Microsoft, combined the Windows 95/98 platform with the security of its Windows NT 4.0 platform.
The result was Microsoft Windows 2000. (click)
While many features remain constant, Windows 2000 has improved user functions.  For purposes of this class we will focus on Windows 2000 Professional, which is very similar to the network based Windows 2000 Server.

It is important to realize the software is generally backwards compatible, that is files and settings from older versions of the program can easily be handled by the new version, but going from the newer to the other does not always work correctly.
In this lesson we will learn the various input functions by using the mouse and keyboard.
There are countless ways to get information into the computer.  The two most common tools you will use are the keyboard and the mouse.
You may wish to show your students an example of the keyboard and mouse.
As you will see, both devices have their own advantages and disadvantages for controlling the computer.
The mouse (plural is mice) is a device originally designed to contour the human hand, though modern mice come in all shapes and sizes.  The mouse is one of the most important navigational tools for a computer.

The mouse was designed with a ball and set of sensors that track the movement of the ball forward to backward and left to right.  While many mice have retained this element, some newer mice utilize other tracking methods such as optical sensors.

The original name came from the fact, with it's cord, the mouse resembles the rodent.   Now some mice are wireless and lack this tail.

The position of the mouse is represented by an arrow on your screen.
This arrow is called a Normal Select Cursor. 
When your computer is working to complete a task, the arrow may turn into an hourglass. Sometimes while the computer is working, you can complete other tasks with the mouse.  If this is the case then you will see the Working in Background mouse icon.  This icon shows an arrow and a small hourglass. If the computer is too busy to complete another task, your pointer arrow will turn into a large hourglass, indicating the computer is Busy. Once the computer is finished the task, the cursor will revert back to an arrow.
Some mice have a wheel between the left and right buttons, called a ‘scroll wheel’.  The scroll wheel functions as an additional tool for navigation.  The scroll wheel lets the user scroll up and down in a window.
The mouse is designed with right handed people in mind, however, in Windows 2000, the user can redefine the significance of the right and left buttons, allowing left handed people more convenient control of their mouse.  It is important to note, in this course, we will refer to mouse actions by their default button settings.
Further explain that mice (plural of mouse) can come in all shapes and sizes, but basic functions and techniques are universal.
Use the mouse to control the cursor.
Point to the object you wish to use. 
Click with the left button to select an object. 
A right click will open a drop down menu, giving the user access to shortcuts for many important functions. 
Double click on an object, or click twice quickly, with the left mouse button to open and object.
The double click method works for three basic types of icons: the folder, the file, the program.  The Start button and everything on the Start menu requires only a single click.  Highlight an icon by clicking on it.  Once highlighted, drag using the left mouse button.
While all tasks can be completed using the mouse, many times the keyboard can save you valuable time by completing the same task without interrupting your work flow.  It is important to note, that you do not need to spend time memorizing these keyboard shortcuts.  In the following lessons you will see how Windows indicates there is a keyboard shortcut available.  For the most part, you will find the keyboard shortcuts most valuable when you are already using it to input text.  This cuts down on the time spent shifting from keyboard to mouse.
In this lesson we will learn about the Windows Desktop and the Start Menu.

Your office or school desk contains many tools that help you to accomplish many tasks efficiently.  You can also choose how to best organize your desk based on your preferences.  And sometimes you need to add new tools to your desk as your needs change.
The computer has a similar design.  Once Microsoft Windows is running you will be looking at the Desktop.  From here you can view many different icons that function just like your stapler, pencil sharpener, etc… in that by utilizing them, you can simplify your tasks.  Windows 2000 is based on a user-friendly, visual, logical organization.
As you use your computer, you may find certain adjustments are needed.  Once  you’ve mastered the basics of Windows, you can go back through and customize your desktop to fit your own unique preferences.  This includes adding new program icons, folders, reordering items, changing the colors, etc…
This is a screen shot. As previously discussed, these views can be customized, so these pictures of the elements of Windows 2000 are only examples.
Explain to the students that throughout this course they will see various screen shots.  As previously discussed, these views can be customized, so these pictures of the Windows are only examples.
You can take this time to describe the icons, wallpaper, etc. briefly, if you deem it necessary, though these topics are covered in greater length later in this presentation.
Take a moment to describe the placement of the Start button.  Please note: though not common, the taskbar containing the Start button can be moved from the bottom of the screen to other locations, but the Start button will remain constant on the taskbar.
“Demonstrate” the mouse clicking the Start button, by clicking any key in during the presentation.  Explain to students that once the mouse actually clicks the Start button, that it will become depressed (or pushed in).  This will bring up the Start Menu.
Depressing the Start button will cause the Start Menu to appear.

You might wish to briefly describe the basic concept of “Programs,” “Documents,” “Search,” “Help.,” “Run,” and “Shut Down.”
This is a chance for your to quiz your students before you move on.  Allow them to guess and then once they answer the question, proceed to next slide with answer highlighted in red.  It may be helpful to read this quiz aloud.
As I just explained, clicking the Start button brings up the Start Menu.
The next slide reviews this concept.  It also serves as a breaking point between old and new topics.
You might wish to briefly describe the basic concept of “Programs,” “Documents,” “Search,” “Help.,” “Run,” and “Shut Down.”
This slide once started will complete all of the actions on it’s own.  Click the mouse only to advance to the next slide.
In this lesson we will learn the common elements of the Windows 2000 window.
Multitasking allows the user to do many things at once.  You do this all the time in life: talking on the phone, while writing a note, and eating dinner.  In Windows you can complete a Word document, while listening to music and searching the internet, all at the same time.  This is only one example of the countless ways on can improve productivity by multitasking.
Click to have a red box appear around the active window.
The Active Window is the window with the highlighted title bar and is generally the window that is on top of all the others.
Click again to make the red box disappear.
Multitasking allows the user to make “piles” of windows.
To make a window active, simply click on the actual taskbar: click on the window’s button on the taskbar, or use Alt+Tab to switch between windows.
Demonstrate on an actual mouse how one double-clicks (this is typically done by quickly tapping the left mouse button twice without a pause in-between).
In this example, we'll open up the My Computer window.
The remainder of this section focuses on the various parts of a standard Microsoft Windows 2000 window.

It is important to realize that is does not matter which window we use for purposes of this example, a standardized interface is what unites all elements of the Microsoft Windows operating systems.
Read the slide aloud to the students
When the Title Bar is active it will be a color (such as this default blue), but when, during multitasking, a window is not active, the title bar will appear a faded gray.
The buttons are found on the right hand side of the title bar.
Minimize- This button will allow you to put aside the window, taking it off the desktop and leaves it only as a button on the taskbar.  The window remains in the computer’s memory. Maximize- When you are viewing a window that does not take up the full dimensions of the screen, but would like it to do so, clicking on this button will result in the window automatically resizing to fill the entire screen. Restore- If you then decide you do not want the window to take up the entire screen (often during multi-tasking), simply click this button to return the window to it’s previous size. Close- This button will exit you from the window and the application, generally a program, will be removed from the current memory.  To view it again, you must reopen the application.
You can only move a window if it is not already maximized to a full screen view.
Now read slide aloud.
It is important to left-click AND HOLD the mouse down.  If you let go, the window will not be able to be moved.

Once you let go, the window will be relocated.  You can repeat this process until you have placed the window where you desire.
Sometimes you may wish to change the size a window on your screen.   This can be extremely helpful when you are multitasking with a wide variety of windows.  This process will allow you to resize an active window, making the window either bigger or smaller.

You can only resize a window if it is not already maximized to a full screen view.

Dragging in towards the center of the window will make it smaller.

Dragging out from center of window will make it larger.
Vertical Resizing- By left-clicking and holding the top or bottom edge of a window, one can make the window longer by pulling out or shorter by pulling in with the mouse.
Horizontal Resizing- By left-clicking and holding the right or left edge of a window, one can make the window longer by pulling out or shorter by pulling in with the mouse.
Diagonal Resizing- By left-clicking and holding any corner of a window, one can make the change the vertical and horizontal dimensions at once.  Again, pulling out will enlarge the window and pulling in will reduce the size of the window.
The Menu Bar is found directly below the title bar.
The menus are revealed by clicking on the words or by pressing the ALT key in combination with the underlined letter.  For example, to open the File menu, one could click on the word “File” or simply press ALT+F.
As you can see, selecting File causes a new set of options to appear.  This is called a Pull-Down Menu, since this set of options, or menu, comes down from beneath the depressed word File.
In this screen one can use the mouse to click on the desired option or simply follow the keystroke directions to the right of the desired option title.  For example, to create a new document one could either click the word with the mouse or simply press CTRL+N on the keyboard. 
This might be a good time to review the functionality of the mouse vs. the keyboard.
The Toolbar is found directly below the menu bar.
By clicking on the icons of the toolbar, one does not need to use the pull down menus.  However, it is important to note that not all options found in the pull-down menus can be found on the toolbar. 
Students should familiarize themselves with the locations of certain common functions, such as Save.  Also, you can tell the students that these toolbars can be customized once they master Windows.
Moving the bar up or down, left or right, allows the user to display more of the window, that does not fit on the current screen. 
This can be accomplished one of two ways:
By clicking on the arrows
By clicking and holding the bar while dragging it in the desired direction
This is a chance for your to quiz your students before you move on.  Allow them to guess and then once they answer the question, proceed to next slide with answer highlighted in red.
As I just explained, clicking the button marked “X” closes the window. 
The next slide reviews this concept.  It also serves as a breaking point between old and new topics.
Please go over this slide aloud with students.
Review:
Minimize- this button will allow you to put aside the window, taking it off the desktop and leaves it only as a button on the taskbar.  The window remains in the computer’s memory. Close- this button will cause you to be exited from the window and the application (generally a program) will be removed from the current memory.  It view it again, you must reopen the application.
In this lesson we will learn the role of the dialog box in the Windows 2000 interface.

At this point, we are going to discover what happens when the menu choice you select requires more user input to complete the task.  If the computer needs more information, a dialog box appears, rather than just the completion of a task.
For this example, we will look at the dialog box for the Print command.
This slide and the following will help you demonstrate the pieces of the dialog box.  A red box will highlight each term, so that you may make reference to it, according to the information below.  Please remember to click before each new topic to ensure the appropriate red box appears.
This slide and the following with help you to demonstrate the pieces of the dialog box.  A red box will highlight each term, so that you may make reference to it, according to the information below.  Please remember to click before each new topic to ensure the appropriate red box appears.
The tabs at the top of the dialog box allow the user to manipulate different sets of settings.
This slide and the following with help you to demonstrate the pieces of the dialog box.  A red box will highlight each term, so that you may make reference to it, according to the information below.  Please remember to click before each new topic to ensure the appropriate red box appears.
Option buttons are used when the user needs to make a decision between two functions.  For example, the user can print either all the pages of the documents or just a few, but the user cannot choose to do both at the same time.
This slide and the following with help you to demonstrate the pieces of the dialog box.  A red box will highlight each term, so that you may make reference to it, according to the information below.  Please remember to click before each new topic to ensure the appropriate red box appears.
Sometimes there are an infinite number of possibilities for the user to select from.  In this case the computer lets the user type in the data.  This entry is done in a text box.  In our example the user can enter the particular pages he/she wishes to print.  It is important to note, that if non-numerical data is entered, the computer cannot complete the action.
This slide and the following with help you to demonstrate the pieces of the dialog box.  A red box will highlight each term, so that you may make reference to it, according to the information below.  Please remember to click before each new topic to ensure the appropriate red box appears.
A spin button functions similarly to the text box, however, the user can click the up or down arrow to increase or decrease the variable in question.  In this case it is the number of copies of the same document the user wishes to have printed.
This slide and the following with help you to demonstrate the pieces of the dialog box.  A red box will highlight each term, so that you may make reference to it, according to the information below.  Please remember to click before each new topic to ensure the appropriate red box appears.
A check box resembles the option button, however, the choices for a check box are not mutually exclusive.  This means that multiple check boxes can be selected at once, compared to the option button that does not allow such an action.
Like the previous slides this slide will help you to demonstrate the pieces of the dialog box.  A red box will highlight each term, so that you may make reference to it, according to the information below.  Please remember to click before each new topic to ensure the appropriate red box appears.
Like the previous slide this slide will help you to demonstrate the pieces of the dialog box.  A red box will highlight each term, so that you may make reference to it, according to the information below.  Please remember to click before each new topic to ensure the appropriate red box appears.
In some cases, there is a set of available choices or options.  When this is the case, a list box will be displayed in the dialog box.  In this example, we are choosing the Paper Source.  The printer has a limited number of paper of sources, so a list box will drop down when you click on the downward triangle on the right side of the list box, you will  then highlight your desired choice.  Once one choice is selected by clicking and highlighting, it will appear in the list box screen in dialog box.
Like the previous slide, this slide will help you to demonstrate the pieces of the dialog box.  A red box will highlight each term, so that you may make reference to it, according to the information below.  Please remember to click before each new topic to ensure the appropriate red box appears.
Sometimes you have questions regarding what the function of an item in the dialog box is.  If you click on the “?,” the help button next to the close button, in the top right corner of the Menu Bar, your cursor will become an arrow with a question mark.  Now when you click on an item a little yellow box with a shadow will appear telling you the function of the item.  Click on the screen after reading this help to return the icon to a regular arrow to resume your action.
Like the previous slide this slide will help you to demonstrate the pieces of the dialog box.  A red box will highlight each term, so that you may make reference to it, according to the information below.  Please remember to click before each new topic to ensure the appropriate red box appears.
A command button is used once you have completed all the preliminary steps.  For example, after you chose what you want to print, how many copies, and to what printer, you can command the computer to produce this output or you can change your mind and cancel.  The buttons marked “Print” and “Cancel” are command buttons.  Clicking them will execute your desired task.
In this lesson we will learn how to seek further support using the Windows Help System.

Explain to students that no course could possibly answers all questions and cover all Windows 2000 functions.  Because of this fact, Microsoft has a built-in help system.
To enter the Help Command:
Click on Start button
Select Help from Start Menu
This is what the Help screen will look like.
The Contents Tab will reveal the “table of contents.”  Unlike a typical book, the user can reveal more subsections or display only the main topics.  This tab is helpful when you are searching for a commonly used Help functions to understand the bigger picture. The Index Tab allows you to view all the topics in alphabetical order, just like the index of a textbook.  Instead of page numbers, the user simply clicks on the word to view the information. The Search Tab allows the user to have the computer look for a specific word or set of words within the help page.  This method tends to yield more matches, however, often times the excessive quantity can be overwhelming.
This is a chance for your to quiz your students before you move on.  Allow them to guess and then once they answer the question, proceed to next slide with answer highlighted in red.  It may be helpful to read this quiz aloud.
As I just explained, clicking the Start button brings up the Start Menu.  From here you choose Help from the Start Menu.  Let’s take a look at what this looks like.  The next slide reviews this concept.  It also serves as a breaking point between old and new topics.
This slide once started with complete all the actions on it’s own. 
Click the mouse only to advance to the next slide.
In this lesson we will learn how to efficiently and effectively manage disks and files.

The formatting process prepares the disk to receive and store data.  During the process the computer divides the disk into concentric circles called tracks and then divides these tracks into sectors.  Nowadays most new disks come formatted.  Formatting a disk with data on it will completely erase all the data.  To ensure that all files and viruses (programs that destroy the file storage system or functionality of the computer) are completely removed it is a good idea to do a full format and not just the quick format option.
When you do your hands-on activities you will be asked to format a disk for later use.  The screens pictured will allow you to complete this task.  There is greater detail provided on the Student CD.

Please reinforce the warning message that will appear.  In order to format the disk the students will have to respond “OK” to the warning message.
Files contain information that the computer can recall for the user to allow actions to occur.

There are two types of files: program and data files.

These files are inter-related.  For example, the application Microsoft Word is stored as a program file, while the actual documents one creates using Microsoft Word are data files.  Without the program file the computer is unable to read the data file.
The computer needs a way to keep all the files separate and unique.  It does so by naming them.  Windows 2000 allows the user to assign the file a unique name that contains up to 255 characters and/or spaces.  Certain characters cannot be used.  It is generally a good idea to keep the files names short and to the point.  After the name you assigned a file, the computer adds a 3 letter extension, such as “.doc” for a Microsoft Word document, this helps the computer associate files and rapidly recall them as needed.  It also provides for more file name possibilities.
This is a chance for your to quiz your students before you move on.  Allow them to guess and then once they answer the question, proceed to next slide with answer highlighted in red.  It may be helpful to read this quiz aloud.
As I just explained, there are certain characters that cannot be used in file names. The next slide reviews this concept.  It also serves as a breaking point between old and new topics.
This slide reviews the characters that cannot make up a file name.
In this lesson we will learn how to organize files by creating and using folders.

The typical computer has tens of thousands of files stored on it.  To organize them, the computer creates a filing system using folders.  Each folder can contain an unlimited number of files.  Additionally, one can create folders within folders an unlimited number of times.  Folders are most useful to the user for quick recall of the location of information.  It also helps to group together files of the same topic, for example, all of the student files will be stored together in this folder.  Inside of it could be another folder called Student Grades, and so on…
This slide and the next show two different ways to view the same folder contents.  This slide is the Large Icons View. 
To select between these two, or any of the other possible views:
Click on View
Select the desired view from the pull-down menu
This view is the Details View.  Can you all see why?
The “…” indicates the current column width prevents all of the information to be show, this can be changed by making the columns wider.
It is also worth noting that making a change to file in any view causes a change to the actual file.  This change can be viewed in any of the different views.
On the other hand, when you change the view, the file itself remains unchanged, only your view of the file is altered.
Microsoft Windows 2000 often provides the user with many different ways of carrying out the same task.  Detailing with files and folders is one of these tasks.  The next few slides will highlight how the My Computer and Windows Explorer applications present the same files and folders.
This screen is the first screen you will see once you select the My Computer icon from the desktop.  This file management device is a little simpler to use, more intuitive, but less functional.
As previously mentioned, this view provides much more valuable information.  For purposes of this lesson, we will primarily focus on the Windows Explorer view.
Read this screen aloud and tell the students to keep this information in mind as we advance to the next slide.  You may need to define the notion of hierarchy- the ordered “nesting” system of a file within a folder, within a bigger folder, etc., etc. until the largest folder: the drive.
As you can see, Windows Explorer's view can be a little intimidating until you learn how to filter out the material you do not wish to view.
Allow the students to get a through look at this screen.  You may wish to take some questions at this point.  The next screen will further explain some of this screen.
You will just need to read this slide to your class and help reinforce this notion.
Expanding and collapsing only affects the view to make it easier for the user to maneuver through.  It does not have any effect on the actual stored file or folder.
In this lesson we will learn how to modify files that you have previously created.
Please note that while the following slides focus on actions performed to modify files, the same actions can be performed on folders.  You may wish to take this time to explain this notion to your students.  All of these tasks will be further developed on the Student CD as they reread through the course material and prepare the hands-on activities.
Moving a file takes it from one location and changes it’s home to another permanent location.

Copying a file leaves the original file in place and makes a duplicate copy in a secondary location.
There will come a point when you will decide you do not wish to have a file on your computer any more.  Sometimes this is caused by a lack of storage space on the disk (floppy or hard).

Getting rid of a file is called deleting it.  There are two methods for deleting files.  There is a keystroke shortcut and there is also a mouse-driven method to complete the same task.  It does not matter which method you choose.
When you delete a file you are actually compressing it and moving it to a new storage location called the Recycle Bin.  Notice it is not called a trash can.  This is because the files are not deleted off the computer until the user goes through and empties out the bin.  It gives the user one more chance to not accidentally remove a file from the computer.  This all also applies to folders (and the files they contain).
When trash is pictured in the Recycle Bin icon, there are files and/or folders waiting to be deleted from the bin.  When the icon shows an empty bin, that means all contents have been permanently deleted from computer’s memory.  Occasionally, a file cannot be stored in the Recycle Bin.  When this is the case, a warning message will alert you to ask if you wish to permanently delete the file.  Deleting files from a floppy disk will permanently remove the file; it will not appear in the Recycle Bin.
If you choose to recover a file it will be sent back to it’s original location and function as it previously did.
This slide requires many incremental clicks from you.  Each click with cause a step in the renaming process to occur.  This slide replicates what the students will see when they complete the same action on their own computer.
Generally speaking, you do not want to change or delete the 3 letter file extension.
Many believe electronic storage is a fail-safe method, however it is certainly not.  The user must be proactive setting up a way to recover the files should the computer’s storage system fail.  This is commonly done through the backup function.

Often, floppy disks are utilized to save the back-up copy of the hard drive files.  You will get to explore this notion during your hands-on activities.
In this lesson we will learn how Windows incorporates the internet into the user's interface.
When we first began this chapter we discussed the fact Windows 2000 broke down the barriers between the computer and the world wide web (often shorted to WWW).  This seamless transition occurs through the integration of the Windows file browser and the internet browser.  In fact, websites are simply files stored on other people’s computers.  Microsoft Internet Explorer allows the user to look at files on the local machine (computer) and the web without exiting the program.
(Click) to display Microsoft Internet Explorer Screen Shot label.
This is what Microsoft Internet Explorer looks like.  Do you see the similarities between this, My Computer, and Windows Explorer?
In this lesson we will learn how to properly shut down Windows 2000.
This slide and the following demonstrate how to safely shut down one’s computer.
When you are ready to turn off your computer there is a proper procedure.  You can not simply push the computer’s power button.  Doing so will cause the computer to lose some of it’s data and possibly cause the computer to fail when you try to start it again.
Though we will cover turning off your computer, sometimes you will wish to restart your computer or log off the network so that someone else can log on.  These procedures begin by selecting Shut Down… from the Start Menu.
From the drop-down menu, chose Shut Down.  This is also where you would choose to restart to log off.  Once you have the desired choice in the window click the OK command button.  The computer will now safely shut itself down.
On most new computers, once Windows shuts down it will also turn off the power to the computer.  However, on some older computers the screen will indicate it is safe to shut off the computer, which you must do manually.  Often times, even with a new computer, you will need to turn off the monitor manually.
Congratulations!  We’ve now covered the basics of Microsoft Windows 2000.  You are now ready to try some exercises on your own via your Student CD.  Let’s review the contents of the CD.
You may wish to read this slide aloud to the class to review what the CD contains.  This is a good time for you to explain what portions will be graded and what materials are simply for their own enrichment.
This presentation was prepared by:
BMGT201, Section0103 at the
University of Maryland
Robert H. Smith School of Business.
Group Members: Joyce Ahn, Sarah Daniels, Matt Myers, and Mark Weinstein
Under the supervision of: Dr. Bob Spear, Ms. Shilpa Shah and Ms. Sarah Ilyas
Sources Consulted:
Grauer, Robert T., and Maryann Barber.  Exploring Microsoft Officer 2000
     Professional, Volume I-Revised Printing.  Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice  
     Hall, 2001.
http://www.microsoft.com