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Teacher:
This slide and the next three slides outline the course objectives that the students should have a grasp on by the end of the presentation. The objectives are designed to foster the student’s understanding of what is expected of them.
Here is a way that you can describe the objectives to the students:
To understand the practicality of Excel refers to why Excel is an important computer program to acquaint oneself with. To familiarize oneself with Excel’s basic features is the objective that is designed to force the student to learn the basics of Excel just through exploring its functions without having to actually create a spreadsheet To appreciate what a spreadsheet is and how to analyze it refers to the goal of recognizing a spreadsheet and being able to interpret the data in the spreadsheet to come to conclusions. These slides that list the objectives should be gone through pretty quickly because they only explain what the students will be responsible for knowing and understanding.
Teacher:
To recognize the difference between a formula and a constant is to understand that a constant is a number that will not change, while a formula is an entry into the spreadsheet that will change based on changing the numbers used to calculate it. To become comfortable with the toolbars in Excel is to comprehend the purpose of the Menu bar, Standard Bar, Formatting Bar, Status Bar, and Task Bar To open, save, and print Excel worksheets is vital to being able to use Excel as it has the same interface functions as other Microsoft programs such as Word and PowerPoint.
Teacher:
To understand the difference between an Excel worksheet and an Excel workbook surrounds knowing that many worksheet combined form a workbook To be able to insert and delete columns and rows is crucial to one’s knowledge of Excel in that one has to be able to edit the data that one puts into a spreadsheet. Excel’s Office Assistant is there as a helper to Excel users that are unfamiliar with some of Excel’s features.  Using the Office Assistant will only help deepen one’s understanding of Excel
Teacher:
Creating formulas to shorten one’s manual labor is the purpose of developing computerized spreadsheets Using Print Preview allows the user to examine a spreadsheet before actually printing the spreadsheet. In the future, long after learning about Excel, the creator’s of this presentation want its readers to be able use Excel when they need to represent data.
Teacher:
This slide details the fact that we will list the objective on the slides that they correspond to, so that the user can see oh this explains objective 2. Teachers should inform their students that the objectives are clearly displayed throughout the presentation to facilitate learning. Teachers should explain that throughout the presentation there will be objectives listed that will reference the objectives from the beginning of the slideshow.
Teacher:
The outline of our presentation is presented on this slide.  Understanding the reasons of why Excel is important to be familiar with is vital to one’s determination to learn Excel. Knowing the general outlook of Excel will allow one to develop a comfort level with Excel before getting to complicated data. Using the basic functions of Excel is vital to master before moving on the learn all of the manipulations and calculations that Excel can perform. Understanding key terms will provide Excel users with a basis to ask questions of other users to actively learn. Changing cell references, adding columns and rows, and deleting columns and rows can change the presentation of a spreadsheet. The only way to fully understand if one has mastered new material is to out your knowledge to the test by practicing. This material should be briefly discussed so that the students will develop a general understanding of the material that will be presented throughout this slideshow.
Teacher:
This is the program that you will be learning about.
This picture was taken from www.wesleyan.ed/libr/tut/excel.
This website is a very practical alternative to using this slideshow to enhance and further one’s knowledge and education of Microsoft Excel.
Teacher:
This slide is intended to allow students to discuss what they already know about Excel.  The teacher should discuss what the students already know about the subject of Microsoft Excel. Be sure that you allow your students the opportunity to express their previous encounters with Excel. Some students may have a basic understanding of Excel, but hopefully students will be able to gain a better and more advanced learning of Excel.
Students:
This slide is your opportunity to share your knowledge and experience with your classmates about your knowledge about Microsoft Excel.
Teacher:
The teacher should use this slide to expose students to uses of Microsoft Excel and their practicality in the real-world. The more computer skills that you have as a potential employee, the better suited you are for a job and the greater chance you have of being hired. Excel spreadsheets are being used more and more by managers in business related fields to keep track of information.  Accountants can balance financial statements in Excel. Many teachers use Excel to keep track of the grades of their students.  Microsoft Excel will not make miscalculations in assigning grades.  It would be great if students would use Excel to record their own grades, so that they have an idea of their performance in particular classes.
Teacher:
This slide is a teacher’s opportunity to discuss what a spreadsheet is.
Approach the students with some excitement for a spreadsheet, so that your students will realize how important knowing what a spreadsheet is. A spreadsheet is a computerized version of an accountant’s paper ledgers that the accountant would use to record transactions and other financial information.
Excel spreadsheets are presented in a grid of columns and rows
Using a spreadsheet can allow an user to organize and analyze data to form the proper conclusions.
Students:
Take notes on what a spreadsheet is and how it is used in the world that you live in.
Teacher:
Show students this slide to allow them to see how one would access Excel through the Start button.
Students:
Students should write down the process of opening Microsoft Excel.
Teacher:
This slide details how to open Microsoft Excel.
Teacher:
This slide provides an alternative to opening Microsoft Excel.
This slide details the process of opening Excel.
First, one must click Start on the Task Bar
Then, one use move up to Programs to find Microsoft Office to click on Microsoft Excel.  One may not have Microsoft Office, so then one should just find Microsoft Excel under Programs.
One may have to maximize the computer screen to get a better view of Excel.
Teacher:
This slide shows the process of opening a new Microsoft Excel file with a screenshot of the process.
Teacher:
This slide details the process of creating a new workbook, so that one will be able to enter data into a new spreadsheet.  The user is now ready to begin the process of creating an Excel file.
Student:
The students should write down how they can open a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, so that they will remember the process.
Teacher:
This slide shows the default layout of an Excel spreadsheet as it appears when a new file is opened.
Teacher:
This is a quick short quiz that will be used throughout this presentation to ensure that the students will have actually learned the material that they should have learned.
Students:
You should answer these practice questions as if they were questions on an exam.  Taking the material seriously will allow you to gain an intricate amount of knowledge about Excel without really having to study that hard.
Teacher:
This is the answer to the question asked on the previous slide.
Teacher:
This is another sample question that will engage the student with the material being presented.
Teacher:
This is the answer to the question asked on the previous slide.
Teacher:
This is another sample question that will show if students are grasping the material that they need to learn and know.
Teacher:
This is the answer to the question asked on the previous slide.
Teacher:
This is the question that will show why Excel has uses beyond just school work, but that Excel can be used in the real world.
Teacher:
This is the answer to the question asked on the previous slide.
Teacher:
This slide shows the different looks that the mouse will appear as it moves across the monitor.  This slides’ pictures have been taken from http://www2.essex.ac.uk/iss/Training/talif/htms/introduction_to_excel.htm. The teacher should describe to the student the different types of mouse looks that are used as basic Microsoft interface.
Teacher:
This slide provides a visual of Excel’s Menu Bar File functions.
Tell the student that they can access these functions by clicking on the File button on the Standard Toolbar.
Teacher:
The File function allows the user to open files, save files, print files, and preview files.  The Page Setup button is a very important button that will be explained later ,but allows the user to change the appearance of the Excel worksheet.
Students:
Be sure to write down the uses of the File function in Excel because you may be tested on it later.
Teacher:
This slide tells the reader of the available functions that present themselves in the Menu Bar.  A user can cut, copy, and paste files and data.  Accessing toolbars will enable the user to use Excel faster and easier.  It is very important to be able to insert new columns and rows to change the data that one is using.  Many of these functions will be presented later in this presentation.
Teacher:
Ask the students to identify the toolbars that are basic Microsoft interface knowledge. This is an interactive slide challenging the student to identify the various names of the components that make up an Excel spreadsheet.  The next slide will show the answers to the identifications that this slide is asking for.
Students: Try to identify the toolbars that you see on this slide.
Teachers:
This slide identifies the toolbars that are used in Microsoft Excel.  Try to define the toolbars, so that the students will gain an understanding of the material.
The Menu Bar correlates to the bar containing File, Edit, and View.
The Standard Toolbar is the toolbar that deals with opening, saving, and printing an excel worksheet. The Name Box is in the toolbar below the standard toolbar that tells the user what cell reference they are entering data into. The Formula Bar tells the user what calculation that they are using in tabulating a particular cell reference. The Worksheet Tabs is the bar right below the actual worksheet; it tells the user what spreadsheet the user is currently working on. The Status Bar tells the user about a command or operation that the user is currently using such as Caps Lock. The Task Bar displays the Start button and the other applications that the user is currently using or is presently open.
Teacher:
This slide shows the user the picture of what their screen should look like when they go to save a file.
Explain the process of saving a file.
Teacher:
This slide explains the process of saving a file.
Teacher:
After clicking File and then Save, this screen should appear on your computer’s monitor.  Excel will ask you where the user the location of where to save this file.  The choices are the A drive, C drive, and the D drive.
Teacher:
This slide shows the choices that the user has in saving files.
Teacher:
This slide tells the user that he or she has a choice in selecting the location that is most appropriate for saving the Excel file.  The common choices are the floppy disk drive that requires a diskette, the hard disk drive saving the file to the actually computer, or a CD which requires your computer to have a program to burn the data on to a CD.
Teacher:
This slide tells the user to be careful about compatibility issues when saving Excel documents.  Newer releases of Excel can open older versions, but newer files can not be opened in older versions of Excel.  Therefore, one must to save the files according to which Excel application one will be using.
Teacher:
This slide will help you show the students how they can change the viewing of the files.
Teacher:
This slide shows the user that when opening a saved file, the user can preview the files in four ways.  This picture is of the List View, which displays only the file name.
Teacher:
This slide shows the Details View which shows the name of the saved file and the date and time when the user last worked on the file.
Teacher:
This slide shows the Preview View that allows the user to see the file name and a preview of the file to see what the beginning of it looks like.
Teacher:
The Properties View shows the user the file name, the author of the file, and how many times the user has made changes to that file.
Teacher:
This slide shows the look of Print Preview and how one can access Print Preview.
Teacher:
This slide visually shows what a Print Preview looks like of a document.
Teacher:
This slide tells the user how to access the Print Preview function to look at a worksheet before actually printing the document.
Teacher:
This slide details creating custom views associated with printing worksheets.  The purpose of creating a custom view is to create ease in viewing the document on the monitor, while also making sure the worksheet prints in a way the satisfies the user.
Teacher:
This slide provides a visual aid to how to print a file.  The process for printing a file is the same as other Microsoft software interface.  The user should click file, move down to print, and then click ok to print the spreadsheet.
Teacher:
The Page Setup function under File on the Menu bar is very important.  It allows the user to change the page’s features.
Teacher:
This slide shows the Page Setup that the user should access to change page format, margins, and headers and footers.
Teacher:
Explain to your students what the uses of Page Setup are so that they can write down the material that you will be giving them. The Page Setup allows the user to change the format of the Excel file that they are currently working on. Portrait and Landscape refer to the how the page will be printed.  Portrait is a vertical page, while Landscape would print the page horizontally.  Landscape is used to make an entire worksheet print on a single sheet of paper when the document is to wide to fit onto the Portrait page. Scaling allows the user to change the printing size of the document by expanding the material or condensing the material. Margins can be changed by the user to increase the print area on a particular worksheet, so that all of the worksheet is printed on the single sheet of paper. Header and Footer allows the user to create a header or footer that will appear at the top or bottom of each page. The Sheet button gives the user the opportunity to separate boxes of cells to print and to allow the user to determine if he or she wants to print the gridlines that separate the columns and rows.
Teacher: Ask the students to answer the following questions.
Teacher:
This is the answer to the question asked on the previous slide.
Teacher:
Here is another question that you can ask of your students to see if they have actually learned anything.
Teacher:
This is the answer to the question asked on the previous slide.
Teacher:
Ask this question to find out if the students have been paying attention to your lecture.
Teacher:
This is the answer to the question asked on the previous slide.
Teacher:
Test the skills of your class with this question.
Teacher:
This is the answer to the question asked on the previous slide.
Teacher:
This slide is a visual aid in how to access the Office Assistant.
The user could click on Help and then move down to Show Office Assistant.
Teacher:
Here is a screenshot of Excel using the Office Assistant in the corner.  Be sure to explain why the Office Assistant is important to the user.
Teacher:
This slide shows the user asking a question of the Office Assistant and how the Office Assistant responds.
Teacher:
The purpose of Excel’s Office Assistant is to provide help to the user when he or she may have question that needs clarification. The Assistant will make suggestions about how to make your worksheet look more professional. The Assistant can be annoying at times, which is why it is recommended to only use it when you need help or have a question.
Teacher:
The students should write down the definitions to the key terms that are listed above. Rows are the horizontal boxes throughout a worksheet.  Rows are labeled with numbers. Columns are the vertical boxes that permeate a worksheet.  Columns are labeled with letters.
Cells refer to the intersection of a column and a row.
Cell reference is the name of the Column letter and the row name, such as A9, or F8.
Students:
Try to define the terms in the slide to see if you have any idea of some Excel terminology.
Teacher: This is a picture of a row.  A row goes horizontally across.
Teacher: This is an example of a column.  A column goes vertically down the page.
Teacher: This is an example of a cell.  A cell is the individual box that the user can type data into.
Teacher:
This slide explains the difference between a worksheet and a workbook.
A worksheet would be a teachers’ grades for a particular class, while a workbook would be the teachers’ grades for all the classes that the teacher teaches combined.
Teacher:
This slide is just a quick quiz to force students to recall what they have learned.  For those students who know the answers, shows that they have been paying attention.  For those students who don’t know the answers, they should start paying attention, so that they can develop a basic understanding of Excel and how to use this common application.
Teacher:
This slide explains the difference between formula and a constant.  A formula can change when data is changed in previous cells.  A formula is a function that contains an equal sign. A constant can never change even when you change cells around the constant in a cell.
Teacher:
This slide shows how the user would want to come up with a formula to calculate the rows without having to do the work by hand.  The user would just type these formulas into the adjacent row to calculate the sum or average of the row.
Teacher:
This slide presents a problem that the next slide will show how to solve.
Teacher:
This slide shows how to access the Function button and then to proceed to the Average function. Explain to the students the process of going step-by-step to the Function capabilities of Excel.
Teacher:
This slide shows the input placed in column B and then the computed answer of the average number of hours that students are sleeping.
Teacher: Make sure that you have clicked in cell B11.  Now, proceed to calculate the average number of hours that students are sleeping by using the average function.
Teacher: Make sure that you have clicked in cell C11.  Now, proceed to calculate the average number of hours that students are studying by using the average function.
Teacher: Make sure that you have clicked in cell D11.  Now, proceed to calculate the average number of hours that students are relaxing by using the average function.
Teacher:
This slide is basically saying that you can change the data in any cell reference at any time and that in calculating formulas, Excel will automatically change the results of the formulas.
Teacher:
These are just short-cuts; they do not have to be used by the students to perform the functions that the students will want to perform. This slide explains how to view the cell formula compared to the actual calculation that Excel does using just the formula.
Teacher:
This slide tells the user the functions that he or she is going to learn how to perform in the next couple of slides.
Teacher:
Make sure that the students are actually gaining an understanding of how to insert all of the term: Rows, columns, and cells
This slide shows how the user can add rows or columns.
Teacher: Here is a screenshot of the new row added between Deo and Jean Claude for Juan Pierre.
Teacher:
This slide tells the process for inserting new rows or columns.  The user hits Insert and then either Row or Column. The new row or column will go in front of the row or column that has been highlighted.  Therefore, you should be very careful to place the inserted row or column in the actual row or column that you want to put it into.
Teacher:
This slide shows how to delete the row of Deo’s.
Teacher:
This slide details the process of deleting rows or columns.  The user should right click the mouse button to bring up a list of shortcuts.  The user needs to move to delete and click it, and then depending on what the user wants to delete should make a selection of entire row, entire column, shift up, or shift left.
Teacher:
This slide forces the students to tell the presenters how to insert a worksheet.
The process is very simple; Click on Insert and move down to Worksheet.
Teacher:
This slide wants students to describe the process in deleting a worksheet.  The user would click on Edit and move down to Delete Sheet and the whole worksheet will be deleted.
Teacher: Here is an exercise for the student to help you perform.
Teacher: This is the answer to the exercise. It is a screenshot of row 2 being deleted.
Teacher: Column B has been deleted as required by the exercise.
Teacher:
This is a common problem to address in that a user can delete just the data in a cell reference by pressing the delete button on the keyboard.  This is the Edit Clear function.  The Edit Delete will eliminate both the cell and the information in the cell.
This slide demonstrates the usefulness of the Autocomplete function that exists in Excel.
Teacher:
This slide explains the feature of Autocomplete which gives the user the opportunity to not have to retype the same word or phrase over and over again. This feature can be handy when you type the same word over and over again, but it can be annoying when you do not want to repeat the same word that has a similar beginning.
This slide also explains how to turn the Autocomplete function on and off.
Teacher:
This slide shows the common interface of Microsoft software. 
Pressing the Tab key allows the user to move around in Excel faster from cell to cell. Pressing the Alt Key and an Underlined Letter will allow the user to perform various functions while working in Excel.  These Alt combinations are the same as other Microsoft programs.
Teacher:
This slide tells the user how to copy and move worksheets.  The user would want to move down towards the worksheet tab and click and drag the worksheet to where the user wants to move it within the workbook. Copying a worksheet involves the same process only that is also includes holding down the Control key to copy the worksheet to a new worksheet.
Teacher:
This slide explains to the user how to rename a worksheet.  Move down to the worksheet tab and double click on the desired worksheet and then type the new name.
Teacher:
This is the final slide of our presentation.  The few websites that we have used in a our creation of our PowerPoint Presentation are as follows http://www.wesleyan.edu/libr/tut/excel/intro.html; http://www2.essex.ac.uk/iss/Training/talif/htms/introduction_to_excel.htm; http://www.gwu.edu/teachme/pp/tm_xl_files/frame.htm
Teacher:
This slide is the opening slide for our presentation.  It describes the purpose of creating this PowerPoint presentation and lists the authors of the presentation.  This presentation is supposed to be used in your class to teach the students the material of basic Microsoft Excel.