Prince George’s Community College

Philosophy 110 – CRN 9444

Critical Reasoning: Logic in the English Language

Fall, 2005

 

 

 

TO: Students Considering Enrolling in PHL 110:

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
A course in informal logic and critical thinking designed to teach students to evaluate logical arguments in daily life and conversation. A large part of the course will be devoted to the role of induction in sound reasoning, with particular focus on the role of analogy in legal and moral reasoning, and the role of probabilistic reasoning in marking off the difference between science and superstition. Students will also learn how to identify informal fallacies, evaluate probability and statistical reasoning, and detect causal connections.


EXPECTED COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Identify Basic Logic Concepts such as validity, truth, soundness, cogency;
2. Distinguish between deductive and inductive arguments;
3. Understand the varieties of meaning and definition, including the intension and extension of terms;
4. Identify informal fallacies as they appear in everyday situations;
5. Determine the validity and soundness of syllogistic arguments;
4. Explain the role of analogy in legal and moral reasoning;
5. Apply techniques for discovering causal connections;
6. Apply sound inductive reasoning to detect superstitious claims

 

Textbook:

Hurley, Patrick, A Concise Introduction to Logic --9th edition. Wadsworth 2006. Make sure you purchase the one that comes with a CD and online access code bundled along with the textbook.

 

 

                                                            COURSE INFORMATION

 

 The course will be conducted entirely online. Using a speaker-equipped computer you will log-on to receive course information, view course content, submit assignments, and interact with the professor and fellow students via email and a chatroom-type “discussion boards.” Unless technical difficulties require such changes, no on-campus classes or meetings are scheduled. However, because of technical difficulties with some of the material covered at the end of the students may be required to take some quizzes at home, which must be faxed back to professor upon completion – and on time.

 

Professor:

Dr. Alicia Juarrero   301-322-0948

ajuarrero@pgcc.edu

 

I look forward to having you in class.

 

Alicia Juarrero