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Adjunct Faculty Surveyed

by E. Yvonne Brinkley, Adjunct, Speech and Theater Department

At the request of Vera Zdravkovich, vice president for Instruction, the Adjunct Faculty Committee surveyed members of the adjunct faculty to collect information that would assist the college in developing new initiatives that would serve adjunct faculty more comprehensively.

As part of this, the survey also sought to determine the kind of content that would be most useful to include in a prospective adjunct faculty newsletter.

Respondents were asked to address the following three questions:

  1. Please rate how challenging each of these instructional activities is for you.
  2. Please rate how helpful the following topics would be as discussions in the adjunct faculty newsletter.
  3. Please rate how helpful the following topics would be as regular features in the adjunct faculty newsletter:

Respondents answered by indicating the level of challenge or helpfulness they associated with ten concerns or topics listed under each of the questions. They also specified "Other" concerns under each question. Since the most useful percentages were associated with challenge levels 3 and 4 for all three questions, levels 1 and 2 are not reported here. Not all ten items are listed—only the ones that provided the most useful data for determining newsletter content.

Adjunct Faculty Survey: Summary of Responses

TABLE 1

Please rate how challenging each of the following instructional activities are for you:

1 – Not al all Challenging 2 – Not Very Challenging 3 – Somewhat Challenging 4 – Very Challenging

Items in Rank Order for "Somewhat"

No. of Responses to 3 & 4

Level of Challenge (%)

3 – Somewhat

4 - Very

Organizing course materials

38

41

 

12

 

13

Understanding the college student

35

39

 

14

 

14

Problem students

32

34

 

21

 

23

Grading papers

31

33

 

13

 

14

Managing paperwork

29

31

 

7

 

8

 

TABLE 2

Please rate how challenging each of the following instructional activities are for you:

1 – Not al all Challenging 2 – Not Very Challenging 3 – Somewhat Challenging 4 – Very Challenging

Items in Rank Order for "Very Helpful"

No. of Responses to 3 & 4

Level of Challenge (%)

3 – Somewhat

4 - Very

Developing a new course and getting it approved

16

17

58

54

 

58

Using technology in the classroom

29

31

 

47

 

51

Creating a Web page for your class

25

27

 

41

 

44

Managing disparate student levels

34

37

 

40

 

43

Using Visuals

41

44

 

31

 

33

Incorporating cultural diversity

38

41

 

30

 

32

 

TABLE 3

Please rate how challenging each of the following instructional activities are for you:

1 – Not al all Challenging 2 – Not Very Challenging 3 – Somewhat Challenging 4 – Very Challenging

Items in Rank Order for "Very Helpful"

No. of Responses to 3 & 4

Level of Challenge (%)

3 – Somewhat

4 - Very

Adjunct opportunities

20

22

 

65

 

70

Professional development

32

34

 

48

 

52

Idea exchange

38

41

 

44

 

47

Internet resources

34

37

 

44

 

47

Community resources for teachers and students

34

37

 

43

 

46

Academic standards

35

38

 

39

 

42

Research findings

34

37

 

39

 

42

News and Views

36

39

 

28

 

30

Occupations

The survey form also requested information about the respondents’ primary occupation, research and/or publishing in his or her field, course development, committee or team service, and teaching division. Among the thirty-one respondents who listed teaching as their primary occupation, most teach at PGCC and several are training consultants, while others teach on the secondary level. Among the six retired instructors were a physicist and a former federal government employee. Included in the list of diverse primary occupations: attorney; executive director; forensic chemist; illustrator; judge; musician/composer; naval officer; nutrition consultant; police officer; psychologist; psychotherapist; registered nurse; statistician; training director; writer/editor, and many others.

Forms were mailed to 380 adjunct faculty members and a total of 93 survey forms were returned, representing an above-average response rate of more that 20 percent. Thanks goes to Sue Gillett in the Instruction Office, Tamela Heath Hawley and Pat Diehl in the Office of Planning and Institutional Research, for their technical assistance with this project. Thanks also to the adjunct faculty members who filled out and returned the survey by the May 14 deadline. Your participation was greatly appreciated.

Additional details about survey results will be printed in a future issue of The Adjuncts’ Perspectives. For further information you may contact me at:  E-mail brinkley@gp.cc.md.us  Phone: Extension 4351

 

The Instructional Area Newsletter, Volume 17, No. 1

Fall 2001