Introduction

Table of Contents

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SECTION 5 - NONCREDIT INSTRUCTION

The noncredit instructional programs, under the leadership of the Continuing Education Division, provide programs for those interested in furthering their particular educational, occupational, cultural, or recreational objectives on a noncredit basis. Scheduling is flexible with courses and workshops arranged to meet the specific needs of groups or individuals. Current formats include semester-long instructional courses, instructional clinics and short courses, services, and special interest programs.

Full- and adjunct faculty and staff are invited to participate in the Continuing Education programs. For general information on Continuing Education programs, contact Dyanne Lyon on extension 0712 in Kent Hall. If you are interested in teaching in specific areas listed below, please contact the person listed.

            Informal Courses

Courses and workshops are provided ranging from several hours to a semester in length, at both on-campus and off-campus locations. Off-campus courses are usually offered in public school buildings, but they may be arranged in churches, day-care centers, or places of private business. An interest in teaching should be indicated by October 1 for the spring semester, or by June 1 for the fall semester. For information contact Paula Guy on extension 0786.

            Conferences

One- or two-day conferences can be arranged to appeal to specific target groups. You may wish to participate in, or help organize, a professional development conference for your professional field or the community at large. For information, call Maureen Ickrath on extension 0879.

            Children's Developmental Clinic

The Children's Developmental Clinic provides a special service to those children in the community who are experiencing various developmental difficulties such as brain damage, mental retardation, emotional disturbances, orthopedic handicaps, learning problems, physical fitness and/or coordination problems. Applicants are accepted on a referral basis. For information call Paul Hahn on extension 0519.

            Senior Citizens Programs

The Continuing Education Division offers a countywide program of courses for senior citizens. Programs are held at activity centers, nursing homes, or on campus and include health and physical fitness, aquatic exercise, creative writing, and many others. Please contact Camille Crawford on extension 0787.

            Police Academy

A six-month program to prepare for a career in law enforcement is approved by the Maryland Police Training Commission, call Major Larry Shanks on extension 0175.

            Entrepreneur Training

Short-term workshops and courses are offered for aspiring or current small businesses owners. For information on these programs contact Mary Jane Shearer on extension 0787.

            Center for Business and Industry Training

The Center for Business and Industry Training (CBIT) offers professional and staff development programs and technical skills training for business industry, government agencies and professional organizations in Prince George's County. Training can be designed to meet a specific need or can consist of credit and noncredit courses chosen from the general offerings available through the college catalog. For information call Katreena Davenport Arnold on extension 0798.

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS

See §7-401 of the college CODE

A.        Grading System

            Grade             Evaluation 

Quality Points
Per Hour of Credit

                        A                     Excellent

4
                        B                     Good; above average

3

            C                     Average

2
                        D                     Poor passing; below average

1

            F                     Failure

0
                        H                     Audit

0

            I                      Incomplete

0
                        P                     Passing

0

            TP                   Deferred Grade

0

            W                   Withdrawal

0

            Q                    Withdrawal for Non Attendance

0

 The grade of "I" (incomplete) is appropriate only in cases where the student's work has been qualitatively satisfactory, but where the student, due to illness or other circumstances beyond his/her reasonable control, has been unable to complete all course requirements. This grade should be given only in cases where a specific, identifiable component of the course needs to be completed and where the instructor can make reasonable provision for the student to make up this work in a timely fashion (e.g., a final examination make-up left on file in the division office, etc.). When the "I" grade is assigned, the student must complete the work assigned by the instructor by the end of the following semester, but need not reregister for the course, and the instructor must complete a Grade Change form to record the appropriate final grade. Otherwise, the "I" grade is administratively changed to an "F." Exceptions to this rule may be granted by the vice president for Instruction on the written request of the student or the instructor if circumstances warrant further delay.

The grade of "P" is designated as passing for those courses which do not apply toward graduation credit. The grade of "P" is most commonly used in developmental and nontraditional course offerings.

The grade of "TP" is a deferred grade and is given to a student who is doing satisfactory work in an academic course with an approved continuance procedure. A student who is not able to complete the objectives of such a course within a semester will be given the grade of "TP." The student has the obligation to register for the course within the next semester in order to earn a grade, otherwise the "TP" grade will remain.

The grade of "W" indicates that the student withdrew voluntarily from the course prior to the 12th week (or 80 percent) of scheduled classes. For purposes of determining eligibility to repeat a course, two W or Q (see below) grades count as one unsuccessful attempt.

The grade of "Q" (withdrawn for nonattendance) is assigned to a student who has never attended the class or ceased attendance during the first 20 percent of the course. The Q grade is treated as a withdrawal from class, dated at the end of the third week of the semester, or its equivalent.

B.        Academic Standing. At the end of each regular enrollment period, each student's cumulative grade point average (GPA) is recomputed to determine that individual's academic standing. The cumulative GPA is computed by dividing the total number of quality points earned in credit courses (A = 4 points, B = 3 points, C = 2 points, D = 1 point, and F = 0 points, per semester hour) by the number of semester credit hours attempted. Educational Development courses (CLS, DVE, DVM, and DVR) are graded on a pass-fail basis, and do not provide the student with a grade point average.

            1.         Minimum Standards for Good Standing

Standards for students who have attempted 20 credit hours/credit hour equivalents or less, including one or more developmental courses:

Credits AttemptedCompletion Standard

                                    2 or more                    50 percent

            2.        Standards for students who have enrolled in only credit courses or have attempted more than 20 credit hours overall:

                        Credits Attempted    Minimum GPA

                                      6 - 20                          1.00

                                     21 - 30                         1.50

                                     31 - 40                         1.75

                                     41 or above                  2.00

Students failing to maintain these standards are placed in the following categories:

                        a.         Academic Warning. A student who, at any point after six credits (or two courses) are attempted, falls below the prescribed minimum standards for good academic standing, is placed on academic warning. Students on academic warning may not register for more than 13 credit hours during any semester in this status. A student on academic warning must improve his or her cumulative GPA every period enrolled. A student on academic warning who fails to reach the prescribed minimum standard even though his or her cumulative GPA has improved, remains on academic warning.

                        b.         Academic Restriction. Academic restriction results when a student on academic warning fails to improve his or her cumulative GPA. Students on academic restriction, with the approval of an academic advisor or counselor, may not register for more than two courses. One of these must be selected from among the following: CAP 102, "Achieving College Success;" CAP 131, "Career Assessment and Planning;" or DVR 006, "College Reading and Study Skills." The second course must be one that was previously attempted but not satisfactorily completed (grades of F, D, Q, or TP) or one that an academic advisor has prescribed that would provide appropriate preparation for courses unsuccessfully attempted. Students who achieve at least a 2.00 semester grade point average (or P grades, when applicable) during the current enrollment period, return to academic warning status, or, if applicable, to good standing. Those who fail to meet this requirement are dismissed. A student can be on academic restriction only once.

                        c.         Academic Dismissal. Academic dismissal results when a student on academic restriction fails to achieve at least a 2.00 GPA (or P grades, when applicable) during the current enrollment period. Academic dismissal precludes registration for any course for a period of at least one semester, unless the student has previously been dismissed from the college. A student dismissed for academic reasons a second or subsequent time is not permitted to register for any courses for one full calendar year.

C.        Transfer of Credits from Other Colleges. Credits earned at other collegiate institutions may be transferred to Prince George's Community College in accordance with the following guidelines:

            1.         The student must arrange to have official transcripts from colleges previously attended sent to the Admissions and Records Office at PGCC. No evaluation of transfer credits will be done until official transcripts are received from each institution from which credits are to be transferred.

            2.         A maximum of 45 credit hours may be transferred, of which not more than 30 credits may have been earned through nontraditional or noncollegiate sources: i.e., CLEP, military training, challenge exams.

            3.         All credits earned previously with passing grades are transferable provided they are applicable to the student's program of study at PGCC. However, the overall grade point average for the courses transferred must be at least 2.00.

NOTE: No grade below a C will transfer from any out-of-state institution when the student's cumulative GPA at that institution was below a 2.00.

            4.         PGCC will honor waivers of required courses by the sending institution due to the student's demonstrated proficiency, but an equal number of credits must be earned in other course work.

D.        Waiver by Departmental or Achievement Examination.

Students in transfer curricula requiring a foreign language who have had two years of a particular language in high school and plan to continue that language in college may have certain of these course requirements waived by submitting College Board Entrance Examination Achievement Test results in the appropriate language (French, German, Spanish, or Russian). The number of semester hours so waived for foreign language must be made up by an equal number of semester hours in other pertinent courses.

E.        Course Withdrawal. To withdraw from any or all classes for any cause during the semester, students must do the following:

            - Get a withdrawal or drop form from the Admissions and Records Office.

            - Obtain the proper signatures.

            - Return the completed form to the Admissions and Records Office. Be sure to retain one copy of the form until you have received your end-of-semester grade report.

The last day to withdraw from a full semester class is shown on the schedule of classes each semester and is normally at the end of the twelfth week of the semester. Students enrolled in classes that end earlier than the traditional length courses should ask the instructor for the withdrawal deadline. No student may withdraw after a course has ended.

Students who fail to follow this withdrawal procedure will receive a failing grade “F” for all courses in which they were enrolled but did not finish.

An automatic grade of "W" will be assigned to all courses for students who withdraw properly.

The official withdrawal date is the date the Admissions and Records Office receives the proper, signed withdrawal form.

Students who stop attending a course prior to its 20 percent point (the third week for a full-semester course) are withdrawn by the instructor for nonattendance. A grade of Q is assigned in such cases. An official withdrawal date is not recorded on the transcript but will be reported to external agencies as the last day of the third week of the semester.

F.        Repeated Courses. Students may repeat courses for credit in which they have earned grades of "B," "C," "D," "F," or "W." When a course is repeated, the original grade and the grade(s) for the repeated course(s) will appear on the student's permanent record. A repeated course will not increase the total number of hours earned toward a degree when a passing grade previously had been earned. The computation of the cumulative grade point average will be based on the last grade received. If a student repeats a course and receives a "W," the original grade will prevail. To be registered for the same course a third or subsequent time, a student must secure permission of the appropriate instructional dean.

G.        Honors. At the end of each regular semester a student who has completed 12 or more semester hours and has earned a minimum semester quality point average of at least 3.25 will be placed on the dean's list. Continued eligibility for the dean's list is based on completion of sets of 12 semester hours.

A candidate for the Associate in Arts degree whose cumulative quality point average is 3.50 to 3.69 will be graduated "With Honors." A candidate for the Associate in Arts degree whose cumulative quality point average is 3.70 to 3.94 will be graduated "With High Honors." A candidate for the Associate in Arts degree whose cumulative quality point average is 3.95 or higher will be graduated "With Highest Honors."

H.        Honors Program Citation. Students who have been accepted into the Honors Program and who have completed a minimum of 15 credit hours in Honors courses while maintaining an overall cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25, are eligible for the Citation in Honors designation.

I.         Academic Appeals. A student dismissed or suspended from Prince George's Community College for academic reasons may direct an appeal to the Academic Appeals Committee. Appeals should be forwarded to the director of Admissions and Records.

J.         Non-Applicable Grades.

            1.        Students who change their program of study after proper advisement and counseling may petition for re-evaluation of their previous courses and their applicability to the new program of study. Courses not relevant to the new program will receive the designation "N/A" (Not Applicable), and will not be counted in the computation of the student's Grade Point Average (GPA). The credits previously earned in such courses shall also be deleted from the student's credit accumulation but not from the student's transcript. Except as provided for in part (2) of this section, the N/A designation shall apply only to courses specifically required in the former program which are not applicable to the new program as required courses, recommended electives, or courses which satisfy the college's general education requirement. Subsequent requests for changes in program of study and/or reevaluation require the approval of the dean of Student Services or his/her designee. Students requesting such changes in curriculum will have their entire transcript history reviewed for applicability to the new program of study.

            2.        Students readmitted to the college after an absence of not less than five calendar years from their last semester of attendance may petition to have not more than 16 credit hours of previous course work declared not applicable (n/a) above and beyond the provisions of part (1). Such students must be registered for the semester in which the petition is filed, and said petition must be filed not earlier than the end of the third week of the regular class schedule for that semester. Students shall prepare the petition in direct consultation with a counselor or an assigned faculty advisor, and the petition must be signed by both the student requesting this consideration and the counselor or faculty advisor who has participated in its preparation. Final approval rests with the vice president of Instruction or his or her designee.

K.        Graduation Requirements

            1.         Requirements for Associate of Arts, Associate of Science,

                        and Associate of Applied Science Degrees

The overall requirements for the associate of arts, associate of science, and associate of applied science degrees are as follows:

                        a.         Earn a minimum of 60 credit hours in academic courses; at least 15 credit hours of this total must be earned at Prince George's Community College. No more than 30 hours may be earned through nontraditional modes.

                        b.         Meet the degree requirements of the specific program of study in which the degree is to be awarded, including the general education requirements, as described in the college catalog issued for the academic year in which study in that curriculum began, or which was in effect during the academic year of the most recent readmission to the college.

                        c.         In addition to the general education requirements, the college graduation requirements include 2-3 credits in physical/health education from the following courses: PED 100, PED 103 or Health (HLE) course. (This requirement is waived for the following programs: Health Information Technology, Nuclear Medicine Technology, Nursing, Radiography, and Respiratory Therapy.)

                        d.         Maintain an overall grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.00 for all courses taken at the college.

                        e.         File a formal application for graduation prior to the deadline published in the academic calendar. The Admissions and Records Office checks for completion of all degree requirements and verifies degree eligibility.

            2.         Requirements for Additional Associates's Degrees

 

Students may earn additional associate's degrees at Prince George's Community College, either by concurrent completion of the requirements of the several degrees, or by subsequent study after the first degree is received. The requirements for earning additional degrees are as follows:

                        a.         Complete all requirements of each program of study including general education requirements.

                        b.         Earn a minimum of 15 credit hours at the college, in addition to those required for the initial degree, for each additional degree.

                        c.         Maintain a minimum grade point average of 2.00 for all courses completed in addition to the initial degree.

            3.         Requirements for Certificates

The overall requirements for the award of a certificate of program completion are as follows:

                        a.         Complete the course and credit requirements of the certificate program of study, as specified in the college catalog in effect for the academic year in which study toward the certificate began, or in effect for the academic year of the most recent readmission to the college.

                        b.         Earn at least 15 credit hours applicable to the certificate at the college, except where special permission is granted by the vice president for Instruction.

                        c.         Maintain an overall grade point average of at least 2.00 for all courses taken at the college.

                        d.         File a formal application for graduation at the time of the final semester's registration.

            4.         Requirements for the Letter of Recognition

The college offers within many of its occupational programs of study the opportunity for students to earn a letter of recognition, signifying successful completion of a cluster of courses that together provide specific skills or areas of competency. The letter of recognition is awarded for the completion of a prescribed cluster of courses of less than 12 credit hours with a 2.00 cumulative GPA for the courses required. At least one required course must have been completed at PGCC. To request a letter of recognition, contact the Admissions and Records Office.

            5.         General Education Requirements

The college's general education requirements are designed to provide each graduate with the skills and knowledge necessary to communicate effectively in oral and written English; read with comprehension; reason abstractly and think critically; understand and interpret numerical data; understand the scientific method; recognize and appreciate cultural diversity; and understand the nature and value of the fine and performing arts. To accomplish the general education goals, all degree recipients must satisfy, in addition to specific program of study requirements, a set of transferable general education requirements based on the particular degree awarded.

            6.         Associate of Arts (A.A.) and Associate of Science (A.S.)

To meet the general education requirements for the Associate of Arts (A.A.) or Associate of Sciences (A.S.) degree, a minimum of 31-34 credit hours, depending on program of study, must be earned in eligible courses distributed as follows:

                                                                                                Minimum Credit

                        Categories                                                     Hours Required

                          A.         EnglishComposition                                       6 credits

                                       EGL 101; EGL 102 or EGL 110 or

                                       EGL 132 or EGL 134.

                          B.         Humanities                                                    6 credits

                                       One 3-credit course must be selected from

                                       among eligible courses in speech and one

                                       additional 3-credit course from among eligible

                                       courses in art, music, theatre, philosophy,

                                       literature, or foreign language.

                          C.         Social Sciences                                              6 credits

                                       Two 3-credit courses from two different

                                       disciplines.

                          D.         Mathematics                                                  3 credits

                                       One eligible mathematics course

                          E.         Science                                                          7 credits

                                       Must include at least one laboratory course.

                          F.         Computer Literacy                                       0-3 credits

                                       CIS 101 or exemption. Not required for the

                                       programs listed below*

                          G.         Cultural Diversity                                           3 credits

                                       One 3-credit course from among eligible

                                       courses that meets this requirement

                                       (see p. 33-34 of college catalogue).

* The following programs of study, because of their emphasis on computer application, do not require a category F (computer literacy) course: computer science, engineering, and nursing.

            7.         Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.)

To meet the general education requirements for the Associate of Applied Sciences (A.A.S.) degree, a minimum of 21-25 credit hours, depending on the program of study, must be earned in eligible courses distributed as follows:

                                                                                                Minimum Credit

                        Categories                                                     Hours Required

                          A.         English Composition                                    6 credits

                                       EGL 101;EGL 102 or EGL 110

                                       or EGL 132 or EGL 134.

                          B.         Humanities**                                               3 credits

                                       One 3-credit course from among eligible

                                       humanities courses, which may also satisfy

                                       the cultural diversity requirement.

                          C.         Social Sciences**                                         3 credits

                                       One 3-credit course from among eligible

                                       social sciences courses, which may also satisfy

                                       the cultural diversity requirement.

                          D.         Mathematics                                                3 credits

                                       One eligible mathematics course.

                          E.         Science                                                     3-4 credits

                                       One 3- or 4-credit course from among

                                       eligible courses in biological or physical

                                       sciences.

                          F.         Computer Literacy                                     0-3 credits

                                       CIS 101 or exemption. Not required for

                                       the programs listed below.*

                          G.         Cultural Diversity**                                     3 credits

                                       One 3-credit course from among eligible

                                       courses that meets this requirement

                                       (see p. 33-34 of college catalogue).

                                    * The following programs of study, because of their emphasison computer applications, do not require a category F, computer literacy course: computer information systems, computer service technology, electronic engineering technology, radiography, respiratory therapy, office technology, space engineering technology.

                                   ** If the cultural diversity requirement is satisfied through a     course in category B (humanities) or a course in category C (social sciences), the category G (cultural diversity) course must be replaced with an elective or requirement course eligible for general education use in any category (A-F).

L.        Academic Dishonesty (Cheating)

The following definitions applicable to Academic Dishonesty are taken from §6-2010 of the college CODE, the Student Code of Conduct:

            1.         Cheating means intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information or study aids in an academic exercise.

            2.         Fabrication means intentional and unauthorized falsification or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise.

            3.         Facilitating academic dishonesty means intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to commit an act of academic dishonesty.

            4.         Plagiarism means intentionally or knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as one's own in any academic exercise.

M.       Academic Procedures for Resolving Alleged Academic Dishonesty

            1.         The instructor confers with the student or students suspected of academic dishonesty. The student is advised of the suspected infraction and the reasons why academic dishonesty is suspected. The student is given an opportunity to admit or deny the academic dishonesty. If the academic dishonesty is not admitted, the instructor may make a finding, based on substantial evidence, whether or not the student committed academic dishonesty.

            2.         In making such a finding, the instructor considers all credible evidence, including, but not limited to, the instructor's observations and those of others, any materials which the student may have been using or attempting to use, and any documents or assignments submitted by the student. The instructor gives the student an opportunity to be heard, furnish evidence in rebuttal, and to explain any actions.

             3.         If academic dishonesty is not admitted, and the evidence is insufficient for the instructor to find that a student committed academic dishonesty, the matter is closed, except that the instructor, without making a finding of academic dishonesty, has the right to give a student a substitute assignment if the instructor believes that the grade on the original assignment is not truly representative of the student's work. The instructor's decision to give a substitute assignment under this section is not subject to appeal.

            4.         If academic dishonesty is admitted, or if the instructor finds that a student committed academic dishonesty, the instructor checks with the office of the vice president for Student Services for information about prior academic dishonesty offenses by the same student.

            5.         If academic dishonesty is admitted or the instructor finds that a student committed academic dishonesty, the instructor, after receiving information from the office of the vice president for Student Services about any prior academic dishonesty by the student, takes one of the following actions:

                        a.         Assigns a grade of zero for the assignment.

                        b.         Assigns a grade of F for the assignment.

                        c.         Gives the student a substitute assignment.

                        d.         Makes a proportional reduction of grade for the assignment.

            6.         In addition to the actions taken under Section 5, if the student has a record of prior academic dishonesty, the instructor refers the matter to the vice president for Student Services for further disciplinary proceedings under F of the Code of Conduct.

            7.         The instructor notifies the student in writing of any findings made and of the action taken. This notice contains a brief statement of the reasons for the decision. The notice may be delivered in person, or may be sent by first class mail to the student's last known address which appears in the records of the office of Admissions and Records. A copy of this notice is sent to the vice president for Student Services to be retained for reference purposes.

            8.         The student is entitled to appeal to the department chair, or, if the instructor is the department chair, to the dean,

                        a.         the instructor's finding, and/or

                        b.         the action taken by the instructor.

Written notice of any such appeal must be received in the office of the department chair (or dean) not later than seven (7) calendar days after the instructor gives notice to the student in person or deposits such notice in the U.S. mails. If the college is not open on the 7th day, the time for such notice to be received is extended until the next day on which the college is open.

            9.         As soon as practicable after receiving notice of such an appeal, the department chairman (or dean) confers with the student and the instructor. If the student appeals from a finding that the student committed academic dishonesty, the department chair (or dean) considers whether the evidence is sufficient to support such a finding. If the appeal is from the action taken, the department chair (or dean) considers whether the action taken by the instructor is appropriate. The decision on appeal finally decides the matter. A copy of this decision is sent to the vice president for Student Services to be retained for reference purposes. If, however, the decision on appeal reverses the instructor's finding of academic dishonesty, the original notice from the instructor and the decision on the appeal are purged from the reference files kept by the vice president for Student Services.

 

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

See §6-205 C of the college CODE

A.        Dealing with Disruptive Student Behavior In Instructional Areas

            1.         Purpose. The purpose of this rule is to implement the Policy on Student Rights and Responsibilities by providing a procedure which an instructor may elect to follow in dealing with disruptive student behavior in instructional areas, as an alternative to, or in addition to, the procedures contained in the Code of Conduct. This procedure is designed to provide an efficient, informal process for resolving student-instructor classroom conflicts.

            2.         Definitions. As used in this rule, the following definitions shall apply:

                        a.         Disruptive behavior and "disruption" mean any behavior that willfully disturbs the orderly conduct of the learning environment. There are two levels of disruptive behavior and disruption. Level I includes, but is not limited to, unwarranted talking, noisemaking, discussing or demonstrating about matters which are not relevant to the subject matter of the class or activity, interrupting the instructor or other students, unnecessary physical activity or movement in an instructional area, or persistent tardiness which interrupts an instructional activity. Level II, in addition to behavior which disrupts the instructional area, is behavior which presents a threat to the safety of those present, and may include, but is not limited to, being under the influence and/or in possession of alcohol or illicit drugs, fighting, assault, battery, threatening others with assault or physical harm, carrying a gun or other deadly or dangerous weapon, or engaging in other verbal or physical conduct that creates an intimidating, hostile, or threatening educational environment. Any student whose behavior falls into a Level II category will automatically be subject to a charge of a violation of the Code of Conduct.

                        b.         Instructional area means any area of the college where instructional activities take place. This includes, but is not limited to, classrooms, laboratories, studios, gymnasia, library facilities, faculty offices, clinical practice facilities, field trip sites, etc.

                        c.         Instructor means any person performing an instructional function for the college. This includes, but is not limited to, instructors, tutors, counselors, advisors, librarians, co-op coordinators, and mentors.

                        d.         Interim suspension means exclusion from the college and all classes, authorized by the president, for a limited period of time pending adjudication of a charge of alleged violation of the Code of Conduct.

            3.         Nondiscrimination. This procedure is to be applied in a nondiscriminatory manner, without regard to a person's gender, race, age, color, religion, veteran's status, disability, ancestry, marital status, or national origin.

                        a.         Election. If a disruption occurs in an instructional area, the instructor may elect to take either or both of the following actions:

                                    (1)       Proceed under this rule as described in the following procedures; and/or

                                    (2)       File a charge with the office of the vice president for Student Services, in which event the matter will proceed under the Code of Conduct.

                        b.         Procedure for Dealing with Disruptive Behavior

                                    (1)       Level II: If a student's behavior, in addition to disrupting the instructional area, presents a threat to the safety of those present, which may include, but is not limited to, being under the influence and/or in possession of alcohol or illicit drugs, fighting, assault, battery, threatening others with assault or physical harm, carrying a gun or other deadly or dangerous weapon, or engaging in other verbal or physical conduct that creates an intimidating, hostile, or threatening educational environment, the instructor should:

                                                a.      Order the student to stop the disruptive behavior and leave the area.

                                                b.      Call, or assign someone to call, the emergency phone number (Ext. 0111) for the campus police to remove, and if necessary, arrest the student.

                                                c.      Notify the department chair and dean, and file a charge under the Code of Conduct with the vice president for Student Services.

                                                d.      If the instructor believes that the student's presence within the college presents an immediate threat to the safety of the college community, the instructor should request, through the dean and vice president for Student Services, that the student be placed on interim suspension.

                                                e.      Unless interim suspension has been imposed by the president, the disruptive student will be required to meet with the dean and/or the vice president for Student Services prior to being permitted to return to class. The instructor will also be present at the meeting unless specifically excused for good cause by the dean and/or vice president. The meeting will be held at the earliest time practicable, but in no event later than three (3) working days subsequent to the instructor's action. The meeting shall be informal in nature. The official conducting the meeting shall seek to determine whether the student should be permitted to return to the instructional area or should be excluded pending resolution of the matter, and provide the student with an explicit warning as to the consequences of any future disruption. The results of this meeting will determine the student's access to work missed.

                                                f.       In addition, the instructor may file charges under various criminal laws, such as §26-101 of the Education Article of the Maryland Code, which provides criminal penalties for persons found guilty of willfully disturbing activities at an institution of higher education.

                                                g.      Level I: Except for disruptive behavior provided for under section (i) above, the following procedures should be used:

FIRST VIOLATION. The first time a particular student causes a disruption, the instructor, depending on the seriousness of the infraction, should:

                                                         1)          Order the student to immediately stop the disruptive behavior and give the student a verbal warning.

                                                         2)          Make a written note of the warning for the instructor's files.

                                                         3)           Talk with the student after class to explain the consequences of any further disruption.

SECOND VIOLATION. The second time a student causes a disruption, or if a student fails to stop the behavior which constituted the first violation, the instructor should:

                                                         1)           Inform the student of the infraction and order the student to leave the instructional area.

                                                         2)           If the student leaves voluntarily, the instructor shall select from the following options for possible readmission into the class, and, to the extent practicable, inform the student of the option before the next class period:

                                                            a)        Permit the student to return the next class period whether or not a charge is filed under the Code of Conduct; or

                                                            b)        Require that the student meet with one or more responsible officials, including the department chair, the dean, and/or the vice president for Student Services, prior to being permitted to return to class, whether or not a charge is filed. Classes missed during the time period in which the student fails to attend this meeting will be recorded as unexcused absences and will be handled as such in accordance with the official course syllabus. The meeting, which will be held prior to the next class, if possible, shall be a mediation/ problem-solving session and shall produce a written warning establishing the consequences of any future infraction, or alternatively, an agreement binding the student to specific penalties or sanctions in the event of any future infractions. There will be no student advisor at this meeting. Following this meeting, the student will be allowed to return to class. Notwithstanding any prior discussions or agreements between the student and the instructor, the vice president, for good cause, including, but not limited to, any record of previous infractions at Prince George's Community College, may impose further conditions or sanctions that he/she may deem warranted, and/or may institute proceedings under the Code of Conduct.

                                                            c)        Failure or refusal by the student to attend the scheduled meeting will result in the matter being referred to the vice president for Student Services for such further action that the vice president deems appropriate, and the student shall be excluded from class until the matter is settled.

                                                            d)        If the student refuses to leave, the instructor shall advise the student that the failure to leave voluntarily renders the student liable for immediate suspension, dismissal, or expulsion, as well as criminal prosecution for trespass. If the student still refuses to leave, the instructor shall call the campus police to have the student removed.

                                                            e)        If the student has had to be removed by the campus police, the instructor is obligated to file a charge under the Code of Conduct, and unless interim suspension has been imposed, the student will be required to meet with the dean and/or the vice president for Student Services prior to being permitted to return to class. The instructor will also be present at the meeting unless specifically excused for good cause by the dean and/or vice president. The meeting will be held at the earliest time practicable, but in no event later than three (3) working days subsequent to the instructor's action. The meeting shall be informal in nature. The official conducting the meeting shall seek to determine whether the student should be permitted to return to the instructional area or should be excluded pending adjudication of the charge. The results of this meeting will determine the student's access to work missed.

THIRD OR SUBSEQUENT VIOLATION, OR VIOLATION OF AGREEMENT: If the instructor determines that the student has been disruptive for the third time, or has violated any agreement as a result of a second violation, a charge against the student under the Code of Conduct is mandatory on the part of the instructor. In addition, the instructor shall:

                                                         (a)          Order the student to leave the instructional area, and if the student refuses to leave, call the campus police, who will remove the student.

                                                         (b)          Notify the department chair and dean of the infraction, and bar the student from further attending class until the matter has been finally resolved by the vice president for Student Services. An informal meeting will be convened by the vice president for Student Services and shall include the student, an advisor chosen by the student, if the student desires one, instructor, and others as determined by the vice president for Student Services.

                                                         (c)          The role of the advisor is limited to an observer of the proceedings and counselor to the student, not the student's legal representative. The advisor is not an advocate and may not comment, question witnesses, or present argument, and may be excluded for doing so. The student will be given a reasonable opportunity during the course of the meeting to confer in private with the advisor. If the student has selected an advisor with personal knowledge of the events leading to this meeting, he/she may give his/her recollection of the events. No continuances will be granted to allow the advisor to attend.

                                                         (d)          The conditions for readmission to class, if permitted at all, shall be determined by the vice president for Student Services and communicated through the dean to the instructor.

            4.         Appeals. A student may appeal to the vice president for Student Services any adverse action taken or decision made under this rule, except that appeals from decisions of the vice president shall be to the president, who may appoint a delegee to consider the same. A student may also seek redress through the department chair of any adverse academic impact of an absence from class imposed under this rule.

                        a.         Any such appeal must be in writing and delivered to the vice president for Student Services (or president, if the appeal is from the vice president's decision) not later than two (2) working days after the student receives notice of the decision. Notice may be delivered to the student or mailed to the student at his or her last address recorded in the Admissions and Records Office. Notice by mail shall be conclusively presumed to have been received by the student five (5) days after the date it is deposited in the mail, first class, postage prepaid, properly addressed.

                        b.         The party considering the appeal will expeditiously conduct such investigation as he or she deems appropriate to determine whether or not the decision appealed is supported by substantial credible evidence, and will give the student an opportunity to present his or her side of the case before deciding the appeal.

                        c.         The decision will be affirmed if supported by substantial credible evidence and if consistent with college policies, procedures, regulations, and rules.

                        d.         A student otherwise barred from attending class will not be permitted to attend class pending appeal except with the written permission of the vice president for Student Services or the president, if the appeal is from the vice president's decision.

            5.         Evaluation. The vice president for Student Services will seek faculty and student participation in a periodic review of this alternative procedure and recommend appropriate changes to the president.