“Phantom Balls”

a memoir by Ryna May

 

Awrgh – my balls!”

   I was not immediately aware that there was anything strange about me saying that.  As I clutched my crotch in feigned pain, I slowly looked around at the ring of startled faces.  My skateboard clattered noisily away, but it was suddenly the only audible sound in the world.  All of the boys in the gang were at a complete loss for words…except Gabe, of course.  “Your balls?” he asked.  Then he looked at my brother, Bryan for an explanation.  I took a deep breath and held it.

   This had all started so innocently.  Gabe said it first.  He fell off his skateboard, hit the rail, and said: “My balls hurt.  That’s the last time I do that.”

   Gabe was our coolest friend at school.  Well, he was the only reason we had any friends at all really.  He was a skateboarder and the leader of a whole gang of skateboarding guys.  My older brother Bryan and I hung out with Gabe because, well, he would hang out with us, and that was just short of amazing.  Breaking into a middle-school clique is the most traumatizing experience that a kid has to go through.  The new kid is never really welcome and always has to have some sort of trick to get in.  With nothing but our rich southern drawls to distinguish us, my brother and I were agonizing over our outsider status together.  We were grateful that someone would talk to us.  We met Gabe and his gang on our first day at Lakeside Middle School – which was about two months after the first day of school for everyone else.  It was the end of the day, and Bryan and I sought each other out in the last period of the day – a sort of middle school recess called “free period.”  It had not been a great first day.  Like the first days at the other 3 schools we had been to in the past year, no one had bothered to befriend either of us.  Little did we know that our fate was about to change.  Gabe saw Bryan and me hanging out sort of nervously at the fringe of the playground and walked right up to us, his cool looking crowd of skateboarding friends trailing along behind him – all long hair, baggy shorts, and Vans shoes.  He looked at us, nodded at each of us, and said “Bring your skateboard tomorrow.”  He was talking to Bryan of course, but I made my mother buy me a skateboard that night.  There was just no way I was getting left behind.

Making friends was easier for Bryan than it was for me because he was a guy.  Among guys, the bonds of friendship are forged through action – with girls it takes months of conversation and spending quality time together to gain acceptance.  Bryan could ride a skateboard and play baseball and jump BMX bikes and tell gross jokes and spit really far.  I learned that I could do those things too – I just had to eliminate the girly things in life, that’s all.  For me, dolls were easy to give up in favor of baseball cards because it meant that I was able to be with my brother and his friends.  I’d left all my friends behind in Tennessee, and since we first moved from our hometown a year earlier, our stepfather’s enlistment in the Navy had jerked us all over the southern portion of the United States.  Bryan became my best friend because having a best friend is a form of survival for a kid.  So I learned to appreciate all of his activities.  The problem was that none of his activities were very couth for a little ten-year-old girl – not that it mattered at all to me.  It horrified my mother at first, but she grew accustomed to the fact that I was going to be a raging tomboy.  At least she still had my little sister to turn into a princess once she found out that I was just not having any of that.

Bryan really didn’t have to, but he always figured out a way to make me a part of whatever he was doing.  Right before we moved to Lakeside, we lived in an apartment complex full of kids called Spring Creek.  He convinced the boys there that I should be allowed to hang out with them – he told them that I was fearless enough to steal garden hoses – and then he made me go and steal them.  Garden hoses were valuable items because they could be used as ropes.  Tied to the branches of trees, they allowed us to swing over the creek like Tarzan’s children, and that was good for hours of fun on hot, Florida summer days.  The complex security guards cut them down all the time, so obtaining a new rope was usually a high priority.  After I procured the hoses, Bryan always insisted that I get the first swing since I had stuck my neck out for it.  That was even riskier than stealing the hoses.  “Well, what are you waiting for?” Bryan asked, “Just jump.”  That was my trick to get in, and it made me cool in the eyes of all the guys.  Getting me in with those guys saved me from a life of boredom – from being relegated to playing Barbie or tea party or watching television alone.

At Lakeside, it was no different.  For some reason, Gabe and his gang accepted that when Bryan joined their tribe, it meant that I had joined as well.  I was the only girl in the gang, but since I never acted like a girl, they didn’t mind having me around.  In that gang, Gabe was the only one who ever talked anyway.  Gabe was tall and strong – and outrageously confident for an 11-year-old kid.  He was the king of the skateboard slackers, and we did whatever he told us to do.  Everyday in the free period at the end of school, we gathered with Gabe and his gang at the edge of the parking lot by the playground to practice our skateboarding prowess.  There is only so much you can do without going airborne, and Gabe decided we should learn to ride down and jump off of rails.  Gabe went first and hurt his balls trying to skate down the handrail of the steps that led out of the cafeteria and out into the parking lot.  He fell off and straddled the rail.  It was not very traumatic for him; he seemed to be okay.  All of his gang had to give it a try as well.  One by one, they tried to complete the stunt, and one by one each of them proclaimed their balls injured.

I didn’t want to do the trick well.  I just wanted to share in the agony of defeat with the rest of the gang.  I hopped up on the rail and fell off on purpose.  I didn’t even hit my crotch; I landed on my feet beside the rail, but I said that my balls hurt – which was exactly what the rest of them said when they fell off.  I didn’t have a clue what balls were or that I wasn’t supposed to have any.  That did become somewhat apparent to me rather quickly from the looks of shock, horror, confusion, and I’m not sure what else on the faces of Gabe’s gang.

What did I know about the differences between boys and girls?  For me, I was more like my brother than I was like my sister, more like my dad than my mom.  I liked being covered in mud and playing with the guys, but I knew I was a girl.  In this seminal playground moment, something like the slow dawn of realization began to creep over me.  I had a flashback to this day when I must have been about five.  I was in day-care, and there was a chubby little boy in there.  He was lying on the mat next to me at naptime.  He secretively pulled the front of his pants down to reveal himself and then jerked them back up and rolled to the other side of his mat where I heard the little girl on the other side of him squeal with fright.  It wasn’t until now, wilting under the stares of the guys that I understood what I had seen.  A hot, sick feeling started to flood through me – starting from the place of my phantom balls and spreading rapidly to my startled, glowing cheeks.

The faces of Gabe, Bryan, and the rest of the gang came into sharper focus.  I looked at each of them one by one and could see that they were taking the measure of me as I stood there clutching my crotch.  They were pretty sure I was a girl, but what if I did have balls?  That sure would throw a wrench into their understanding of the mysteries of life.  After all, they were only eleven.  What did they really know about it anyway?  Gabe opened his mouth to say something else, but before he could, my brother laughed.

Bryan’s laugh pierced the bubble of tension around us.  “You’re funny,” he said, “your balls!”  Gabe and the gang fell over themselves laughing, and I finally exhaled.  I wonder if big brothers remember all of the times they have to come to the rescue for their little sisters?  Little sisters never forget all of the times they have been saved.