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Courses offered in the behavioral social and business studies division
 

ACC    Accounting ECN    Economics PSY     Psychology
ANT    Anthropology EDU    Education RLS     Real Estate
BUS     Business Law FOS     Forensic Science RPM    Residential Property Management
COS    Correctional Services MGT    Management SOC    Sociology
CJT      Criminal Justice MKG   Marketing  
ECE     Early Childhood Education PAR     Paralegal  

 

Accounting (ACC) 

Accounting Department 

Temporary Services Building T, Room 13 

301-322-0713

 

ACC 100 Fundamentals of Accounting. 3 Credits  Preparation for ACC 101 for students lacking background  in accounting. Enroll in ACC 100 directly or transfer from  ACC 101 during the first five weeks of a semester.  (Note: Does not satisfy program concentration requirement in  business-related curricula; may not be taken for credit if credit  has previously been received for ACC 101 or higher.)

 

ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I. 4 Credits  University-parallel introductory accounting sequence. Covers  major accounting theories, principles, and applications. Regular  classroom, and online formats available. Students should have  had previous accounting or have completed ACC 100 or  ACC 103. Prerequisites: Math (DVM with P4 or appropriate  test score) and reading proficiency or ACC 100 with C or higher  or ACC 103.

 

ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II. 4 Credits  Second semester of sequence. Continues focus on accounting  theories, principles, and applications. Regular classroom and  online formats available. Prerequisite: ACC 101. (Honors version  available spring only.)

 

ACC 103 Accounting for Managers. 3 Credits  Focuses on sources of accounting information and the meaning  of financial reports as an aid to decision-making. This course  adopts a user’s approach and does not emphasize the technical  aspects of record maintenance. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

ACC 104 Microcomputer Applications in Accounting. 3 Credits  A hands-on course in the use of microcomputers to process  accounting data. Knowledge of programming is not necessary.  Projects emphasize accounting applications. Prerequisite:  ACC 100 or ACC 101.

 

ACC 105 Payroll Accounting. 1 Credit  Covers payroll preparation, payroll rules, recordkeeping and  payroll tax reporting. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

ACC 107 QuickBooks I. 1 Credit  Students will learn to establish a chart of accounts, vendor, customer  and payroll records, entering typical transactions and preparing  standard financial reports for service firms using QuickBooks  software. Prerequisite: ACC 100 or ACC 101 or ACC 103.   

 

ACC 108 Introduction to Spreadsheet Accounting. 1 Credit  Basic spreadsheet applications in accounting. Use of spreadsheets  for recordkeeping, computation, analysis and presentation of  accounting data is covered. Prerequisites: Reading proficiency;  ACC 101 or ACC 103; CIS 101.

 

ACC 109 QuickBooks II. 1 Credit  Students will learn to establish a chart of accounts, vendor,  customer and inventory records, entering typical transactions  and preparing standard financial reports for merchandising firms  using QuickBooks software. Prerequisite: ACC 100 or ACC 101  or ACC 103.

 

ACC 110 QuickBooks III. 1 Credit  Students will learn budgeting, job costing and nonprofit accounting  using QuickBooks software. Prerequisite: ACC 107 or ACC 109.

 

ACC 201 Intermediate Accounting I. 3 Credits  Intermediate-level accounting covering cash, investments, receivables,  inventories, plant assets, and measurement of financial  income in accordance with accounting principles (GAAP).  Prerequisite: ACC 102 with C or higher. Classroom sections  offered fall semester only. Online sections offered spring semester  only.

 

ACC 202 Intermediate Accounting II. 3 Credits  Accounting principles applied to corporations, including  stockholders’ equity and liability sections of the balance sheet.  Prerequisite: ACC 201 with C or higher.

 

ACC 203 Cost Accounting. 3 Credits  Basic concepts of cost accounting functions within a manufacturing  organization, including measurement of material costs, labor  costs, manufacturing overhead and marketing costs. Prerequisite:  ACC 102. Classroom sections offered fall semester only. Online  sections offered all semesters.

 

ACC 204 Principles of Auditing. 3 Credits  Analysis of audit functions and responsibilities. Emphasis on  examining accounting records and drawing valid audit conclusions.  Prerequisites: ACC 202; MAT 114 completed or concurrent.

 

ACC 207 Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting. 3 Credits  Accounting applied to local, state, and federal agencies, or schools,  hospitals, and other nonprofit organizations. Covers general, special  revenue, enterprise, and fiduciary funds and cash planning and  control. Prerequisite: ACC 102. Offered fall semester only.

 

ACC 208 Spreadsheet Accounting. 3 Credits  Applies spreadsheet skills to financial and managerial accounting  applications, analysis, and problem solving. Prerequisites:  ACC 102 and CIS 101. 3 class hours with open lab.

 

ACC 212 Accounting Information Systems. 3 Credits  This course examines accounting information systems, both manual  and computerized. The course includes information on current  technologies in information systems including hardware, software,  networks, databases, and data communications. Internal controls  and security issues are examined. Prerequisite: ACC 102.

 

ACC 221 Federal Income Tax. 3 Credits  Study of the federal tax system includes survey of tax legislation,  court rulings and their application to individuals. Prerequisite:  ACC 101.

 

ACC 222 Advanced Tax Accounting. 3 Credits  A second course in taxation, which examines the tax consequences  of operating a business. The course emphasizes the  federal income tax treatment of corporations and partnerships  with some coverage of estates and trusts. Prerequisites: ACC 102  and ACC 221.

 

ACC 225 Business Finance. 3 Credits  Capital markets and the banking system, including financial  analysis and planning, working-capital management, capital  budgeting, and long-term financing. Prerequisite: ACC 102 and  MAT 112.

 

ACC 281 CPA Review I—Business Environment and  Concepts. 3 Credits  This is the first in a series of courses to prepare accounting students  to sit for the CPA exam. Course content includes general  business environment and business concepts that are needed to  understand the underlying business reasons for and accounting  implications of business transactions and the skills needed  to apply that knowledge. Prerequisites: ACC 202, ACC 203,  ACC 204, ACC 207, ACC 221, and BUS 122.

 

ACC 282 CPA Review II—Regulation. 3 Credits  This is the second in a series of courses to prepare accounting  students to sit for the CPA exam. Course content includes  federal taxation, ethics, professional and legal responsibilities,  and business law and the skills needed to apply that knowledge.  Prerequisites: ACC 202, ACC 203, ACC 204, ACC 207,  ACC 221, and BUS 122.

 

ACC 283 CPA Review III—Auditing and Attestation. 3 Credits  This is the third in a series of courses to prepare accounting students  to sit for the CPA exam. Course content includes auditing  procedures, generally accepted auditing standards and other standards  related to attest engagements and the skills needed to apply  that knowledge in those engagements. Prerequisites: ACC 202,  ACC 203, ACC 204, ACC 207, ACC 221, and BUS 122.

 

ACC 284 CPA Review IV—Financial Accounting and  Reporting. 3 Credits  This is the fourth in a series of courses to prepare accounting  students to sit for the CPA exam. Course content includes  generally accepted accounting principles for business enterprises,  not-for-profit organizations, and governmental entities and the  skills needed to apply that knowledge. Prerequisites: ACC 202,  ACC 203, ACC 204, ACC 207, ACC 221, and BUS 122.

 

ACC 289H Honors Colloquium in Accounting. 3 Credits  This Honors colloquium will examine special topics in the field  of accounting and its relevance across disciplinary perspectives.  The issues to be addressed in each colloquium will vary from  semester to semester. These courses are designed for students in  the Honors Program, but are open to others with the approval of  the honors coordinator or the instructor. Prerequisites: Reading  proficiency and permission of instructor or honors coordinator.  ACC 291–293 Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits

 

Anthropology (ANT) 

Anthropology, Economics and Sociology Department 

Marlboro Hall, Room 2054

301-322-0525

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ANT 101 Introductory Physical Anthropology 3 Credits SS  Humans’ place in nature, including genetics, evolutionary theory,  primate behavior, human physical variations and culture.  Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

ANT 103 Introductory Cultural Anthropology 3 Credits CD, SS  Anthropological approaches to culture, language and social organization,  including religious belief, gender role, family form, and  economic life. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency. (Honors version  available.)

 

ANT 201 Introduction to Archaeology. 3 Credits  Survey of archaeology, including its development in America  and an overview of archaeological methodologies. Prerequisite:  Reading proficiency.

 

ANT 203 Language and Culture. 3 Credits CD  Theories of language dealing with learning, diversity, creativity  and change. Relation of language to perception, ethnic identity,  occupation, and social class. Prerequisite: One of the following  courses: ANT 101, ANT 103, PSY 101, SOC 101, SPH 101, or  SPH 109.

 

ANT 205 Peoples and Cultures. 3 Credits CD  Cultures of a major world region. The region studied varies and  may include one of the following: Sub-Saharan Africa, India,  Circum-Mediterranean, Middle East, Far East and the Americas.  Prerequisite: One of the following courses: ANT 101, ANT 103,  ANT 203, HST 247 or SOC 101.

 

ANT 213 Magic, Witchcraft and Religion: An Anthropological  Interpretation. 3 Credits  A survey of religion and related phenomena in a variety of societies  around the world. Considers the relationship of religion to  other aspects of culture. Prerequisite: ANT 103 or SOC 101.

 

ANT 289H Honors Colloquium in Anthropology. 3 Credits  This Honors colloquium will examine special topics in the field of  anthropology and its relevance across disciplinary perspectives. The  issues to be addressed in each Colloquium will vary from semester  to semester. These courses are designed for students in the Honors  Program, but are open to others with the approval of the honors  coordinator or the instructor. Prerequisites: Reading proficiency  and permission of the instructor or honors coordinator.

 

 

Business (BUS) 

Criminal Justice, Forensic Science and Legal Studies  Department 

Bladen Hall, Room 208 

301-322-0553

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BUS 122 Business Law I. 3 Credits  Basic theory and applications of business law; covers contracts,  agency and property. Prerequisite: MGT 101.

 

BUS 124 Business Law II. 3 Credits  Second semester of sequence. Covers partnership law, corporations,  sales and commercial paper. Prerequisite: BUS 122.

 

Correctional Services (COS) 

Criminal Justice, Forensic Science and Legal Studies  Department 

Bladen Hall, Room 208 

301-322-0553

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COS 151 Introduction to Corrections. 3 Credits  Introduction to the field of corrections as it relates to the justice  system. It focuses on the history of corrections and the forms of  criminal sanctions at the federal, state and local levels.

 

COS 153 Corrections Management. 3 Credits  A study of the administration of the corrections system to  include organizational structure, function and theory related to  the practice of policy management.

 

COS 251 Community-Based Corrections. 3 Credits  A survey of the types of programs in operation and the managerial  practices underlying these programs.

 

COS 253 Probation and Parole. 3 Credits  A survey of the dimensions of probation and parole, including  responsibilities, goals, techniques and impact.

 

Criminal Justice (CJT) 

Criminal Justice, Forensic Science and Legal Studies  Department 

Bladen Hall, Room 208 

301-322-0553

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CJT 151 Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 Credits  A survey of the history, philosophy and social development  of police, courts, and corrections in a democratic society.  Identification and operations of local, state, and federal  Agencies will be covered with criminal justice career orientation.  Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

CJT 152 Police Operations. 3 Credits  Understanding the duties, authority, responsibilities and rights of  the uniformed police officer. Emphasis is on the function of the  patrol officer as it relates to criminal investigation, intelligence, vice  units and traffic administration. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

CJT 153 Law Enforcement and the Community (Cross-  Cultural Relations).  3 Credits CD  A study of the relationship between police and the community  with recommendations for ways of working together to reduce  crime. Emphasis is placed on policing in a culturally diverse  society. (Credit may not be received for both SOC 153 and CJT  153.) Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

CJT 154 Police Management. 3 Credits  A study of the administration of police to include the organizational  structure, function and theory related to the practice of  police management. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

CJT 155 Juvenile Delinquency. 3 Credits  Examines studies of youth crime: its volume, causes and trends.  The prediction, prevention, treatment and control of juvenile  delinquency by social control agencies is examined relative to  social policies needed to reduce its incidence. The organization  and procedures of the juvenile justice system will be explored.  Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

CJT 162 Victimology. 1 Credit  The victims of crime and their impact on the administration of  justice. 3 class hours for 5 weeks.

 

CJT 166 Narcotics and Drug Enforcement. 1 Credit  Narcotics violations and investigative techniques used in these  cases. 3 class hours for 5 weeks.

 

CJT 170 Domestic Violence. 1 Credit  Domestic violence and the ways in which the criminal justice  system deals with this problem. 3 class hours for 5 weeks.

 

CJT 171 Community Policing for Officers. 3 Credits  A thorough examination of the role and duties of a community  police officer. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

CJT 172 Community Policing for Administrators. 3 Credits  An in-depth examination of the administration and management  of community policing. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

CJT 251 Criminal Law. 3 Credits  The study of substantive criminal law as applied to the local,  state and federal systems. Court decisions are used to address  various sources and types of criminal laws. Prerequisite: Reading  proficiency.

 

CJT 253 Criminal Investigation. 3 Credits  A study of the fundamental principles and procedures employed  in the investigation of crime. Emphasis is placed on the investigation  of specific crimes, the identification of sources of information,  and the procedures necessary for the proper handling of  evidence. The course is designed to develop a working knowledge  of the steps of investigation beginning with the initial security of  the crime scene and concluding with the presentation of evidence  and proper testimony in court. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

CJT 254 Criminal Evidence and Procedure. 3 Credits  An examination of the principles and techniques of criminal procedure  employed during trials to determine the admissibility of  physical and testimonial evidence. An analysis of laws and court  decisions relating to admissibility is emphasized. Prerequisite:  Reading proficiency.

 

CJT 256 Terrorism. 3 Credits  An overview of the historical aspects of terrorism, past and present.  Students will learn the origins, causes and issues and how  the media plays a part in today’s world of terrorism. Prerequisite:  Reading proficiency.

 

CJT 291–293 CJT Internship. 1–3 Credits  The internship is a practicum with measurable learning objectives  designed to broaden the educational experience. Students  are assigned to appropriate governmental and private criminal  justice agencies.

 

Early Childhood Education (ECE) 

Education Department 

Marlboro Hall, Room 2025 

301-322-0190

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ECE 100 Basic Concepts in Early Childhood Education 3 Credits  Required for those not meeting the reading test score prerequisite  for ECE 151. Covers basic topics in child development for early  childhood educators with emphasis on improving reading, writing  and presentation skills.

 

ECE 101 Transition to the Credit Program in Early Childhood  Education. 1 Credit  Designed to provide a positive transition for 90-hour, non-credit  course completers seeking upward mobility by enrolling in the  credit program. Emphasis is on theoretical foundations of the  profession, major topics in child development, and skills and  techniques to ensure readiness for entry into the credit A.A.S.  degree program. Preparation to take course equivalency tests for  ECE 151 and ECE 257 is included. Prerequisite: 90-hour child  care course in Continuing Education and permission of the  department chairman.

 

ECE 105 Principles and Practices in Early Childhood  Education. 3 Credits  Provides a conceptual framework for understanding the role of  the early childhood education professional and services in the  field of educating and caring for young children, birth to age  eight. Emphasis is placed on applying developmentally appropriate  practices to child care and early childhood development settings.  Prerequisite: ECE 151.

 

ECE 151 Child Growth and Development. 3 Credits  An introduction to the growth and development of children.  Emphasis is on physical, intellectual, emotional and social aspects  of child development and techniques to foster optimum development  in early education settings. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency  or ECE 100 with grade of C or better.

 

ECE 154 Observing and Recording Child Behavior. 3 Credits  Observing, interpreting and recording children’s behavior in various  settings using principles of early childhood development and  education. Prerequisite: ECE 151.

 

ECE 156 Introduction to Early Childhood Special Education 3 Credits  Introduction to the field of special education for children from  birth to age eight, including characteristics of children with disabilities  and related instructional techniques to apply in child  care and early childhood development settings. Prerequisite:  ECE 151. (Honors version available.)

 

ECE 165 Planning Programs for Infants and Toddlers. 3 Credits  Designing and implementing a developmentally appropriate program  for infants and toddlers. Prerequisite: ECE 151.

 

ECE 170 Multicultural Education in the Preschool Classroom  3 Credits CD  Cultural diversity with emphasis on understanding cultural pluralism  and avoiding stereotyping. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.  (Honors version available.)

 

ECE 191 Early Childhood Program Management. 3 Credits  Basic organization, management and operation of child care/  early childhood education programs. Prerequisite: ECE 151.

 

ECE 220 Internship in Special Education I. 3 Credits  Guided introductory experience in developmental programs  for children with special needs. The weekly seminar focuses on  the professional role and responsibilities of the special educator.  Principles of quality developmental education, contemporary  practices and professional trends and issues will be covered with  emphasis on ongoing professional development and self-evaluation  skills. Students will begin to prepare a professional portfolio  reflecting their experience. Prerequisites: ECE 151 and ECE 156.  1 class/6 field hours.

 

ECE 221 Internship in Special Education II. 3 Credits  Guided advanced experience in developmental programs for  children with special needs. The weekly seminar focuses on the  professional role and responsibilities of the special educator.  Principles of quality developmental education, contemporary  practices, and professional trends and issues will be covered, with  emphasis on ongoing professional development and self-evaluation  skills. Students will complete a professional portfolio reflecting  their experience. Prerequisite: ECE 220. 2 class hours/6 field  hours.

 

ECE 251 Language Arts in Early Childhood Education 3 Credits  Curriculum strategies for enhancing the language and literacy  skills of children from birth to age eight in child care/early learning  centers. Emphasis will be placed on the interrelationship of  oral language, reading and writing and the key role of the early  childhood environment in programming literacy. Students will  learn to foster language skills in all domains of the curriculum  for young children. Prerequisite: ECE 151.

 

ECE 254 Field Work in Child Care. 6 Credits  Designed to provide the student with “real life” experience in a  center for young children or an elementary school’s prekindergarten  or kindergarten classroom under the guidance of both  the classroom teacher and a college supervisor. The student  is given the opportunity to test his/her level of development  when interacting with children and to devise more appropriate  techniques based on careful evaluation. In addition to basic classroom  involvement, the student is given the opportunity to plan  specific activities on a daily and weekly basis. Prerequisites: HLE  215, ECE 151, ECE 154, and ECE 257. 2 class/12 field hours.

 

ECE 257 Curriculum Development in Early Childhood  Education. 3 Credits  Students will use knowledge of child development to plan  developmentally appropriate curriculum and activities for young  children. Students will also explore current theories, philosophies  and models of curriculum development within the field of early  childhood education. Prerequisite: ECE 151 completed or concurrent.

 

ECE 259 Planning for Creativity. 3 Credits  Curriculum activities and techniques to enhance creativity of  young children. Prerequisite: ECE 151. (Offered fall semester  only.)

 

ECE 260 Guiding Behavior in Early Childhood Education 3 Credits  Fostering positive social behavior in the early childhood center.  Causes of various kinds of behavior and methods to solve behavior  problems will be explored. Prerequisite: ECE 151.

 

ECE 262 Fieldwork in Early Childhood Education 3 Credits  Supervised educational on-the-job experience in an early childhood  center or primary elementary classroom. Related instruction  and conferences supplement work with children. Prerequisites:  ECE 257, ECE 151, and ECE 156. 2 class hours/6 field hours.  ECE 291–293 Cooperative Education. 1–3 Credits

 

Economics (ECN) 

Anthropology, Economics and Sociology Department 

Marlboro Hall, Room 2054 

301-322-0525

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ECN 101 Economic Development. 3 Credits SS  Development of American capitalism, including evolution of the  capitalistic system and roles of agriculture, manufacturing, trade,  transportation, communication, money and banking, government,  and international trade. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

ECN 103 Principles of Economics I. 3 Credits SS  First semester of university-parallel sequence. Introduction to  economic macroanalysis, emphasizing gross national product,  national income, consumption, investment, taxation, government  spending and monetary and fiscal policies. Prerequisites:  Reading and mathematics (DVM with P3 or appropriate test  score) proficiencies.

 

ECN 104 Principles of Economics II. 3 Credits SS  Second semester of university-parallel sequence. Introduction to  economic microanalysis, focusing on the role of the individual  consumer and the behavior of businesses under different market  conditions. Prerequisites: Reading and mathematics (DVM with  P3 or appropriate test score) proficiencies.

 

ECN 199 Special Topics: Money and Banking I. 3 Credits  This special topics course provides an in-depth study of the  Federal Reserve System, financial institutions, and the nature  and effectiveness of the Federal Reserve’s use of monetary policy  tools. This course is the first of two that prepare students to make  a presentation before the Federal Reserve Bank in Baltimore.  (Also offered as MGT 199. Students may not receive credit for  both ECN 199 and MGT 199.) Prerequisites: Math proficiency;  ECN 103 with a B or higher.

 

ECN 289H Honors Colloquium in Economics. 3 Credits  This Honors colloquium will examine special topics in the field  of economics and its relevance across disciplinary perspectives.  The issues to be addressed in each colloquium will vary from  semester to semester. These courses are designed for students in  the Honors Program, but are open to others with the approval of  the honors coordinator or the instructor. Prerequisite: Reading  proficiency and permission of instructor or honors coordinator.

 

ECN 291–293 Cooperative Education. 1–3 Credits

 

ECN 299 Special Topics: Money and Banking II. 1 Credit  Uses the concepts learned in ECN 199 to develop a presentation  on monetary policy that a team of students will deliver  to the Federal Reserve officials at the Federal Reserve Bank in  Baltimore. (Also offered as MGT 299. Students may not receive  credit for both ECN 299 and MGT 299.) Prerequisite: ECN 199  or MGT 199.

 

Education (EDU) 

Education Department 

Chesapeake Hall, Room 310E 

301-322-0780

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EDU 200 Foundations of Education. 3 Credits  This course introduces the study of schools from historical,  philosophical, political and sociological perspectives. Current  issues and practices in education are explored with attention to  the many interactive influences of schools and society. Students  who are considering teaching as a career should take this course  with EDU 233. Prerequisite: EGL 101 or departmental approval.  (Honors version available.)

 

EDU 203 Introduction to Special Education. 3 Credits  This course is designed to introduce you to the field of special  education. We will cover the education of exceptional students:  historical, philosophical, educational and legal issues; current  practices in assessment, diagnosis and teaching. The course is  designed for teacher preparation, in-service, and recertification.  Prerequisites: Open to all in-service teachers. Undergraduates  seeking the Associate of Arts in Teaching must complete EDU  200 and EDU 233 prior to enrolling in this course. A.A.T. students  should take EDU 234 at the same time as EDU 203.

 

EDU 205 Assessment of Students. 3 Credits  This course is an introduction to test and measurement in an  educational setting. Students will construct the knowledge and  understanding needed for selecting, administering, diagnosing,  evaluating, and reporting results of standardized and informal  techniques of measurement. This course will review definition,  concepts and current issues in measurement. The Maryland State  Assessment Program will be highlighted. Prerequisite: In-service  teacher or department approval.

 

EDU 210 Processes and Acquisition of Reading. 3 Credits  Intended for students seeking the Elementary or Early Childhood  Associate of Arts in Teaching and for in-service teachers and  career changers. Students will be able to explain the language and  cognitive precursors to the reading acquisition process. Students  will demonstrate a knowledge of phonemic awareness, phonics,  vocabulary, comprehension, and fluency in developing readers.  Prerequisites: EDU 200 (Elementary AAT students); ECE 105  (Early Childhood AAT students.)

 

EDU 211 Instruction of Reading. 3 Credits  Intended for in-service elementary teachers and career changers.  This course focuses on the teaching of reading fro pre-kindergarten  through 8th grade. Students will develop and use a variety  of developmentally appropriate word recognition and reading  comprehension strategies. Students will also examine a balanced  literacy program which fosters phenomic awareness, phonics,  vocabulary, comprehension, and fluency. Prerequisite: In-service  elementary teacher or departmental approval.

 

EDU 212 Assessment of Reading. 3 Credits  Intended for in-service elementary teachers and career changers.  Students will expand their understanding of appropriate assessment  practices and apply these practices to literacy assessment.  Students will learn a variety of assessment tools and techniques for  the elementary classroom. For each type of assessment presented,  students learn administrative procedures, explore strengths and  limitations of the instrument or technique, and practice developing  instructional implications from results. Prerequisite: In-service  elementary teacher or departmental approval.

 

EDU 213 Materials for Teaching Reading. 3 Credits  Intended for elementary in-service teachers and career changers.  It introduces students to a variety of materials to be used for the  purposes of developing phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary,  comprehension, and fluency. Students will learn to select and evaluate  materials as well as utilize the expertise of parents and other  members of the community to help fulfill goals of the reading  program. Prerequisite: In-service teacher or departmental approval.

 

EDU 214 Teaching Reading in the Content Areas: Part I 3 Credits  This course focuses on the essentials of reading processes necessary  for secondary students to become proficient readers. Participants  gain an understanding of the purposes and types of reading,  methods of assessing reading, strategies and skills in reading  instruction, and affective dimensions of reading. Prerequisite: Inservice  secondary teacher or department approval.

 

EDU 215 Teaching Reading in the Content Areas: Part II 3 Credits  This course expands upon Part I, focusing on types of reading,  skills in reading, and instruction. The emphasis is on teaching  secondary students to learn from text. Participants will formulate  research questions, complete a literature review and implement  and evaluate a coherent literacy plan. Participants will also implement  reading and writing strategies that promote understanding  of subject area content. Prerequisite: EDU 214.

 

EDU 220 Special Education Methods: Birth—12th Grade 3 Credits  Students will understand and use a variety of organization,  teaching and classroom management strategies. The course will  focus on effective practices in different settings with all disability  groups, as well as collaboration with other involved professionals  and parents. Prerequisite: In-service teacher seeking Generic  Special Education Certification.

 

EDU 221 Special Education Methods: Birth—6th Grade 3 Credits  Students develop knowledge and skills in planning lessons for  diverse learners, teaching oral language, writing, reading, mathematics  and content area material to students with special needs  in both early childhood and elementary settings. In addition,  students will explore special topics including inclusion, transitioning  and social skills development. Prerequisite: In-service  teacher seeking Generic Special Education Certification.

 

EDU 222 Special Education Methods: Grade 6—Age 21 3 Credits  This course focuses on current practices in teaching students with  special needs in grades 6 through 12. Students will review/demonstrate  a variety of teaching techniques in the areas of functional  skills, managing the learning environment, reading, writing, mathematics,  and the content areas. Special focus is placed on transition  education and services for adolescents. Prerequisite: In-service  teacher seeking Generic Special Education Certification.

 

EDU 223 Special Education Assessment Part I: Birth—12th  Grade. 3 Credits  This course provides the opportunity for students to develop the  knowledge and skills for selecting, administering, interpreting,  diagnosing, reporting, using assessment data, monitoring and  evaluating of the instructional program. Legal perspectives, technical  aspects of assessment tools, accommodations, computer as a  tool for assessment, and nondiscriminatory testing will be examined.  Prerequisite: In-service teacher seeking Generic Special  Education Certification.

 

EDU 224 Special Education Assessment Part II: Birth—12th  Grade. 3 Credits  Students develop knowledge and skills in assessment, administration,  interpretation, programming and alignment of test data  with teaching standards. Trends in informal assessment, observation  techniques, family assessment, vocational assessment, work  sample analysis, task analysis, portfolios and teacher-made tests  will be explored. Prerequisite: In-service teacher seeking Generic  Special Education Certification.

 

EDU 233 Field Experience for Foundations of Education 1 Credit  This course is required for education majors. It is an opportunity  for students to observe local teachers in elementary, middle and  high schools. They will become familiar with the local school  system and with how teachers and schools address educational  issues studied in the Foundations course. Prerequisite: EDU 200,  completed or concurrent.

 

EDU 234 Field Experience for Special Education. 1 Credit  This course is required for education majors. Students will engage  in guided observations of special education practice in local public  schools for a total of 15 hours. They will assist model teachers as  requested. Prerequisite: EDU 203, completed or concurrent.

 

EDU 235 Field Experience for Educational Psychology 1 Credit  This course is required for education majors. Students will  engage in guided field observations of the teaching and learning  process. They will spend at least 15 clock hours in a school at  the level at which they want to be certified. Students will attend  a seminar at PGCC every other week. The field experience is an  opportunity to apply concepts learned in PSY 206 to processes  of teaching and learning at a local school. Students may also provide  assistance to classroom teachers as requested. Prerequisite:  PSY 206, completed or concurrent.

 

EDU 240 Elementary Methods. 3 Credits  This course focuses on strategies of teaching in the elementary  grades and knowledge of the theory and research supporting  these strategies. Opportunities for practice of planning and delivery  of instruction will be provided. A goal of this course is to  develop the habit of reflective practice and to foster collaborative  problem solving. Prerequisite: In-service elementary teacher or  department approval.

 

EDU 250 Secondary Methods. 3 Credits  This course is designed to provide secondary teachers with knowledge  of theory and teaching practices, current educational goals,  both nationally and locally, and trends in educational assessment  and application. This knowledge will be used to plan, design and  conduct effective instruction. Supplemental topics will include  multiculturalism and classroom management. Prerequisite: In-service  secondary teacher or department approval.

 

Forensic Science (FOS) 

Criminal Justice, Forensic Science and Legal Studies  Department 

Bladen Hall, Room 208 

301-322-0553

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FOS 205 Instrumental Analysis. 4 Credits  The use of scientific instruments in forensic testing is the focus  of this course. Lectures and laboratories cover instrumentation  theory, data systems, method development, and qualitative and  quantitative analytical techniques. Techniques discussed with  laboratory activities include gas chromatography (GC), infrared  spectrometry (IR), ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV-Vis),  high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and gas  chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Credit will not  be given for both FOS 205 and CHM 205. Prerequisite: CHM  201. 3 class/4 lab hours. (Offered spring only)

 

FOS 209 Cell Biology. 4 Credits  This course examines the structure and function of cells with  particular emphasis on metabolism, reproduction and the molecular  aspects of cell communication and regulation. Credit may  not be received for both FOS 209 and BIO 209. Prerequisites:  BIO 103 and CHM 101. 3 class/3 lab hours.

 

FOS 213 Forensic Psychology. 3 Credits SS  An understanding of the issues forensic psychologists are asked to  address by the courts such as assessments of competency to stand  trial, criminal responsibility, pre-sentencing evaluations and dangerousness,  as well as child custody evaluations. (Credit may not be  received for both PSY 213 and FOS 213.) Prerequisite: PSY 101.

 

FOS 250 Introduction to Forensic Science. 3 Credits  An introduction to the scientific discipline directed at the recognition,  identification and evaluation of physical evidence through  application of the natural sciences to criminal investigation.  Emphasis is placed on the role of the forensic scientist. Formerly  FOS 101. Students may not receive credit for both FOS 101 and  FOS 250. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

FOS 251 Forensic Aspects of Death Investigation. 3 Credits  A medicolegal examination of death from mutual cooperation  between the medical examiner and the homicide investigator.  (Formerly FOS 151. Students may not receive credit for both  FOS 151 and FOS 251.) Prerequisites: FOS 101 and reading  proficiency.

 

FOS 252 Forensic Aspects of Drug Identification and Abuse 3 Credits  An understanding of the nature of poisoning, the pharmacokinetics  of drug interaction on brain neurochemistry and other  organ systems in the human body. This course is an overview of  how the human cravings for illicit and licit drugs affect human  behavior. (Formerly FOS 152. Students may not receive credit  for both FOS 152 and FOS 252.) Prerequisite: FOS 101 and  reading proficiency. (Honors version available.)

 

FOS 253 Fire and Arson Investigation. 3 Credits  A study of the standards or guidelines for proper fire scene investigation.  (Formerly FOS 153. Students may not receive credit for  both FOS 153 and FOS 253.) Prerequisite: FOS 101.

 

FOS 254 Physical Identifiers (Fingerprinting Techniques).  3 Credits  An examination and application of the science of fingerprints,  using current methods of detection, development and preservation.  This course will also examine basic fingerprint identification  theory, processing techniques and the fingerprint identification  role within forensic science. (Formerly FOS 154. Students may  not receive credit for both FOS 154 and FOS 254.) Prerequisite:  FOS 101 and Reading proficiency.

 

FOS 255 Photography in the Forensic Sciences. 3 Credits  An introduction to the use of digital photography in the documentation  of evidence associated with crime scenes. (Formerly  FOS 155. Students may not receive credit for both FOS 155 and  FOS 255.) Prerequisite: FOS 101.

 

FOS 257 Firearms and Tool Marks Identification. 3 Credits  A study of firearms identification, ballistics, shot and powder  patterns, cartridge casings and tool marks. (Formerly FOS 157.  Students may not receive credit for both FOS 157 and FOS  257.) Prerequisite: FOS 101.

 

FOS 258 Basic Accident Investigation. 3 Credits  An understanding of the latest methods of conducting traffic  accident investigations. (Formerly FOS 158. Students may not  receive credit for both FOS 158 and FOS 258.) Prerequisite:  Reading Prerequisite: FOS 101.

 

FOS 259 Crime Scene Investigation. 3 Credits  A practical hands-on approach to evidence identification, documentation,  collection and handling from the crime scene to the  crime laboratory to presentation in court. A fixed lens 35 mm  camera or digital camera is required by the student. (Formerly  FOS 159. Students may not receive credit for both FOS 159 and  FOS 259.) Prerequisite: FOS 101 and FOS 255.

 

FOS 260 Computer Forensics: Investigation of Computer-  Related Crime. 3 Credits  The investigation of computer-related crime, such as threatening  e-mail, child pornography, and Internet-related crimes. Formerly  FOS 160. Students may not receive credit for both FOS 160 and  FOS 260. Prerequisites: CIS 101 and FOS 250. 2 class/2 lab hours.

 

FOS 291–293 FOS Internship. 1–3 Credits  The internship is a practicum with measurable learning objectives  designed to broaden the educational experience. Students  are assigned to appropriate governmental and private agencies.  3–9 practicum hours.

 

Management (MGT) 

Business Management Department 

Temporary Services Building TO, Room 115 

301-322-0080

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MGT 101 Introduction to Business. 3 Credits  Basic characteristics of the business enterprise, its organization  and role in a free society. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.  (Honors version available)

 

MGT 140 Strategic Management. 3 Credits  The increasing complexity of the global market requires managers  and entrepreneurs to possess strong conceptual and strategic  planning skills. This course provides an introduction to strategic  planning and the strategic management process: strategy  formation, strategy implementation, and strategy evaluation.  Prerequisite: MGT 101 or equivalent.

 

MGT 142 Organizational Development. 3 Credits  The rapidly changing business environment forces managers and  entrepreneurs to adapt or exit the organization/market. Even if  a manager possesses strong strategic management skills, without  the ability to manage change and exert the leadership necessary  to implement change, the organization will fail. This course  is designed to provide an understanding of the forces behind organizational development (OD), the managerial tools used to  implement OD, and the managerial skills that will enable the  manager to effectively introduce change into the organization.  Prerequisite: MGT 101 or equivalent.

 

MGT 150 Developing a Professional Image. 1 Credit  Techniques for developing a professional image. Attire, nuances  of nonverbal communication, and office etiquette.

 

MGT 155 Elements of Supervision. 3 Credits  The supervisory function of the first-line supervisor. Emphasis  on decision making and problem solving using case studies and  role playing. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MGT 157 Small Business Management. 3 Credits  The basics of establishing and managing a small business.  Developing a business plan, financing, managing employees and  marketing. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MGT 160 Principles of Management. 3 Credits  The business organization, the functions of management and the  role of the manager in the decision-making process. Prerequisite:  Reading proficiency.

 

MGT 162 Financial Planning and Investments. 3 Credits  Financial planning concepts, their application and the risk factor  in the management of finances. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MGT 165 Customer Service. 3 Credits  Examines the dynamics of exceptional customer service. Develops  skills necessary in dealing with customers effectively, using  creative techniques to improve communication skills to achieve  customer satisfaction. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MGT 171 The Business Plan. 1 Credit  Develops a business plan in the context of the mission and purpose  of a business, the strategic planning process and the impact  of business climate forecasts on business. Prerequisite: Reading  proficiency.

 

MGT 180 Microcomputer Applications for the Business  Manager. 3 Credits  Introduction to computer business applications: word processing,  spreadsheets, databases, graphics and communications.  Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MGT 190 Introduction to Public Administration. 3 Credits  An overview of public administration and its principles, evolution  and current issues. Examine the role of government and  nonprofit organizations in society.

 

MGT 196 Managing in the Public Sector. 3 Credits  Introduction to the public sector. Application of management  principles to federal, state and local governments. Examine the  role of management in government, public responsibility and  trends in the public management.

 

MGT 199 Special Topics: Money and Banking I. 3 Credits  Provides an in-depth study of the Federal reserve System, financial  institutions, and the nature and effectiveness of the Federal  reserve’s use of monetary policy tools. This course is the first of  two that prepare students to make a presentation before officials  at the Federal Reserve Bank in Baltimore. Also offered as ECN  199. Students may not receive credit for both ECN 199 and  MGT 199. Prerequisite: ECN 103 with B or higher and math  proficiency.

 

MGT 250 Introduction to Federal Contracting. 3 Credits  Fundamental concepts and principles of the federal procurement  system and use of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR).  Topics include the background of federal contracting, careers in  contracting, types of contracting, competition, federal acquisition  process, small purchase procedures, bids and proposals, and  the award/protest process. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MGT 251 Introduction to Source Selection. 3 Credits  Experiencing the source selection process, developing a source  selection plan, proposal preparation and evaluation. Content of  course includes best and final offer (BAFO), contract format,  proposal design, request for proposals (RFP), invitation for  bid (IFB), types of source selection, cooperative purchasing,  performance base contracting, best value procurement and open  solicitations. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MGT 252 Principles of Negotiation. 3 Credits  Negotiation skills, strategies and tactics to effectively prepare,  conduct and document a successful negotiated contract using the  negotiation process. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MGT 253 Procurement Law. 3 Credits  The fundamental rules, regulations, policies and laws pertaining  to procurement, changes in the law, remedies for bidders, procurement  integrity and ethics. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MGT 254 Contract Administration. 3 Credits  Management of the contract from beginning to the end to comply  with the guidelines of the government rules and standards of the  contract. Role of the contract officer and the agreement to complete  the terms of the contract. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MGT 255 Cost and Price Analysis. 3 Credits  Application of fundamental concepts and evaluation of contract  price and cost principles. Prerequisites: Reading and math  proficiencies.

 

MGT 258 Compensation and Benefits Management. 3 Credits  Fundamental concepts of compensation management, theory  of organizational reward systems and methods of compensating  employees. Topics include compensation objectives, employee  benefits options, internal and pay structures, incentive programs,  performance appraisals, union and government roles in compensation,  and international pay systems. Prerequisite: Reading  proficiency.

 

MGT 259 Employee Training and Development. 3 Credits  Introduction to organizational training and development through  the assessment of training needs in the workplace. Topics include  designing and implementing training and development programs;  methods of evaluating the effectiveness of these programs; and use  of media and technology. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MGT 261 Human Resource Management. 3 Credits  Principles and practices of human resource management in the  business organization. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MGT 263 International Management. 3 Credits  This course provides future managers with the basic skills and  knowledge necessary for transition into the world of international  business. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MGT 265 Purchasing, Contracting and Materials  Management. 3 Credits  Procurement and materials management, including specifications,  source selection, pricing, contracting and inventory control.  Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MGT 266 Conflict Management. 3 Credits  Powerful techniques for dealing effectively and confidently with difficult  situations. Building and strengthening more cooperative and  productive working relationships. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MGT 268 Entrepreneurship. 3 Credits  Coverage of the basic characteristics of entrepreneurship and  the free enterprise system. The course is designed to acquaint  students with the many diverse areas of entrepreneurship, from  beginning to end, including but not limited to: identifying a  viable product or service, target markets, financing, and ethics. It  is designed to provide further understanding of the vital role of  business ownership in a free society.

 

MGT 270 Stress Management in the Workplace. 3 Credits  Designed to provide a comprehensive approach to stress management.  Through a combination of lectures, experiential learning  and self assessment, students will have an opportunity to develop  their own strategy for stress management. Prerequisite: Reading  proficiency.

 

MGT 272 Managing Workplace Diversity  3 Credits CD  This course examines diversity in the workplace and the resulting  challenges to corporate culture in developing an understanding  of diversity. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency; MGT 160  recommended.

 

MGT 275 Leadership Development. 3 Credits  Development of practical, effective workplace leadership skills  through study, observation and application. Integrates readings  from humanities, experiential exercises, films and contemporary  readings on leadership. (Credit may not be received for both  SPH 275 and MGT 275.) Prerequisites: Reading and oral proficiency.  (Honors version available.)

 

MGT 289H Honors Colloquium in Management. 3 Credits  This Honors colloquium will examine special topics in the field  of management and its relevance across disciplinary perspectives.  The issues to be addressed in each colloquium will vary from  semester to semester. These courses are designed for students in  the Honors Program, but are open to others with the approval of  the honors coordinator or the instructor. Prerequisites: Reading  proficiency and permission of instructor or honors coordinator.

 

MGT 291–293 Cooperative Education. 1–3 Credits  MGT 296 Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace. 3 Credits  Superior performance requires both intellectual and emotional  intelligence. This course provides a fundamental understanding  of how emotional intelligence (EI) impacts communication,  leadership, and decision-making styles as well as how to better  utilize EI in managing cross-functional teams and overall workforce  productivity. Prerequisite: MGT 101 or equivalent.

 

MGT 299 Special Topics: Money and Banking II. 1 Credit  Uses the concepts learned in MGT 199 to develop a presentation  on monetary policy that a team of students will deliver to Federal  Reserve Officials at the Federal Reserve Bank in Baltimore. Also  offered as ECN 299. Students may not receive credit for both  ECN 299 and MGT 299. Prerequisite: MGT 199.

 

 

Marketing (MKG) 

Business Management Department

 Temporary Services Building TO, Room 115 

301-322-0080

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MKG 251 Introduction to Marketing. 3 Credits  Principles and techniques of marketing goods and services, including  advertising, sales promotion, retailing, and wholesaling.  Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MKG 263 International Marketing. 3 Credits  An understanding of the principles of marketing within the context  of the international market. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MKG 271 Salesmanship. 3 Credits  Ideas and techniques used in selling and their relationship to  specific products and services. Development and maintenance  of a sales organization and its personnel. Prerequisite: Reading  proficiency.

 

MKG 273 Retail Business Management. 3 Credits  Overview of retail business, including types of businesses, their  organization, retail buying, selling, advertising and merchandising.  Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MKG 277 Advertising. 3 Credits  Overview of the advertising world, including use of media, research  and development of ideas, writing copy and producing radio and  television commercials. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

MKG 291–293 Cooperative Education. 1–3 Credits

 

Paralegal (PAR) 

Criminal Justice, Forensic Science, and Legal Studies  Department 

Bladen Hall, Room 208 

301-322-0553

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PAR 151 Introduction to Law for the Paralegal. 3 Credits  An overview of the law, the court system and the role of the paralegal  in preparing cases for trial and appeal. Prerequisite: Reading  proficiency.  PAR 155 Techniques of Legal Research. 3 Credits  Develops legal research skills. Students utilize a law library for  preparing legal research assignments. Prerequisites: Reading proficiency  and EGL 100.

 

PAR 157 Contracts. 3 Credits  Survey of laws governing the formation and breach of contracts,  including defenses, statutes and remedies. Prerequisite: PAR 155.

 

PAR 158 Employment Law. 3 Credits  This course examines the rights and duties of employers and  employees and the role of the paralegal as part of the team representing  each. Topics include the rights and duties of all parties  when hiring, promoting, transferring, and terminating employees;  privacy and discrimination issues; hour and wage laws; the  role of government and labor unions; and injury-on-the-job  issues. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

PAR 159 Domestic Relations. 3 Credits  Prenuptial and separation agreements and the laws affecting  separation, divorce, alimony, child support, custody and visitation.  Prerequisite: PAR 155.

 

PAR 160 Civil Litigation. 3 Credits  Survey of the rules regulating civil suits with practical exercises  in interviewing clients and witnesses, analyzing documents, and  drafting pleadings. Prerequisite: PAR 155.

 

PAR 161 Legal Ethics for Paralegals. 3 Credits  Designed to address the subject of ethical considerations which  apply to both lawyers and paralegals when dealing with clients,  the courts, and other parties to disputes. Prerequisite: Reading  proficiency.

 

PAR 251 Legal Writing and Documents. 3 Credits  Style and techniques of legal writing. Practice in drawing pleadings,  agreements, contracts, deeds, mortgages, wills, trial briefs  and memoranda. Prerequisites: PAR 155 and EGL 101.

 

PAR 253 Torts and Insurance Law. 3 Credits  Torts recognizable in Maryland and defenses. Personal injury  actions and insurance claims. Prerequisites: PAR 155.

 

PAR 255 Real Estate Transaction. 3 Credits  The paralegal’s role in the sale and titling of residential property.  Not designed to meet Maryland real estate licensure requirements.  Prerequisites: PAR 155 and PAR 251.

 

PAR 257 Drafting Wills and Probating Estates in Maryland 3 Credits  Organization and jurisdiction of the orphans’ court and the  procedures required in drafting wills and administering estates.  Prerequisites: PAR 155 and PAR 251.

 

PAR 291–293 PAR Internship. 1–3 Credits  The internship is a practicum with measurable learning objectives  designed to broaden the educational experience. Students  are assigned to appropriate governmental and private agencies.  3–9 practicum hours.

 

Psychology (PSY) 

Psychology Department

Marlboro Hall, Room 2054 

301-322-0525

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PSY 101 General Psychology. 3 Credits SS  University-parallel introductory course which surveys the field of  psychology, including the study of behavior, cognitive processes,  the concepts of memory, perception and sensation, consciousness,  personality development, psychological disorders, psychotherapy,  and social behavior. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency  level. (Honors version available)

 

PSY 115 Death and Dying. 3 Credits  Historical and current concepts of death and dying, including  implications of euthanasia and suicide. Prerequisite: Reading  proficiency.

 

PSY 201 Personality and Adjustment. 3 Credits SS  Theories of personality and personality development, personal  adjustment and mental health. Prerequisite: PSY 101. (Honors  version available)

 

PSY 203 Child Psychology. 3 Credits SS  Physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and moral development  of the child from conception until adolescence. Prerequisite:  PSY 101.

 

PSY 204 Adolescent Psychology. 3 Credits SS  Physical, cognitive, social, emotional and moral development of  the adolescent, including discussion of different phases of adolescence.  Prerequisite: PSY 101.

 

PSY 206 Educational Psychology. 3 Credits  Focus on the processes and theories of learning, individual differences,  measurement, motivation, emotions, and problem solving,  as well as thinking and communication in educational settings.  Prerequisite: PSY 101. For A.A.T. students this course should be  taken with EDU 235.

 

PSY 207 Human Growth and Development 3 Credits SS  Life-span psychology covers the physical, cognitive, social, emotional,  and moral development of the individual from conception  until death. Prerequisite: PSY 101. (Honors version available.)

 

PSY 208 Abnormal Psychology. 3 Credits SS  Focus on human behaviors and mental experiences that are  unusual, unreasonable, and distinct from cultural norms.  Appropriate psychotherapeutic interventions as well as changing  views of mental disorders are considered. Prerequisite: PSY 101.  (Honors version available)

 

PSY 209 The Psychology of Aging. 3 Credits  The biological, psychological, historical and cultural aspects of  aging are presented in a multidisciplinary approach. Diversities  in the aging experience are discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

 

PSY 210 Psychology of Women. 3 Credits  An introductory course focusing on developmental, ecological,  psychological and gender issues relevant to women. Prerequisite:  PSY 101.

 

PSY 211 Psychology and African Americans 3 Credits CD  Examines the psychology of African Americans from Afrocentric,  historical, behavioral, developmental, and humanistic perspectives.  Prerequisite: PSY 101.

 

PSY 212 Drugs and Behavior. 3 Credits  Overview of the use of psychotropic drugs, including abused drugs  as well as those used to treat mental disorders. Topics include legal  and scientific issues relating to psychopharmacology, as well as its  historical context. Treatment, law enforcement, and educational  perspectives are also considered. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

 

PSY 213 Forensic Psychology. 3 Credits SS  Introduces concepts that unite psychology and the law, and  reviews statutes governing competency, insanity and involuntary  commitment. Students will become acquainted with forensic  assessment techniques, including the interview process, specialized  training, and the collection of collateral information. Also  considered are the assessments of competency to stand trial, criminal  responsibility, and dangerousness. Pre-sentencing and child  custody evaluations are discussed as well. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

 

PSY 219 Social Psychology. 3 Credits SS  Covers predominant theories and research strategies, focusing  on social cognition, including beliefs, judgments, behaviors and  attitudes; social influence, including conformity, persuasion, and  group influence; and social relations, including the theories and  research on aggression, prejudice, attraction and intimacy, altruism,  conflict, and peacemaking. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

 

PSY 220 Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology 3 Credits  Introduces the principles of psychology as they apply to sport  and exercise, including ethics and problems in research methodology,  motivation, learning, social behavior, performance  enhancement, youth sports, gender issues, leadership and exercise  issues. Multicultural and international views of the field are also  considered. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

 

PSY 289H Honors Colloquium in Psychology.  Special Topic: Political and Psychological Perspective on  Leadership. 3 Credits  Team-taught by political science and psychology professors, this  colloquium will examine the phenomenon of leadership by focusing  primarily on the scholarship and analysis of several modern  approaches. Leadership theories of Harvard psychologist Howard  Gardner provide the framework for comparing leaders in a variety  of fields. Political scientist James McGregor Burns’s psycho-political  paradigm of transforming leadership will be used to examine  such leaders as Queen Elizabeth I, Gandhi, Franklin and Eleanor  Roosevelt, Martin Luther King, and Mikhail Gorbachev, all major  contributors to political, military, scientific, and cultural aspects  of our society. Prerequisites: Minimum score of 95 of the college’s  reading placement exam, 3.00 cumulative GPA, and permission of  the instructors or the honors coordinator.

 

PSY 291-293 Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits

 

PSY 298 Industrial and Organizational Psychology. 3 Credits  Organizational development, social and organizational behavior,  and motivation strategies in government and private industries.  Personnel development and training aspects include job analysis  and evaluation as well as performance appraisal. Effective leadership,  management and decision-making styles and stress in the  workplace are also considered. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

 

Real Estate (RLS) 

Business Management Department 

Temporary Services Building TO, Room 115 

301-322-0080

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All real estate courses are offered in both credit and noncredit  modes. Noncredit CEUs in RES 305 may be converted to RLS 103  through examination. Consult program coordinator for details.

 

RLS 103 Real Estate Principles and Practices for Salespersons 4 Credits  Satisfies the 60-hour educational requirement for real estate salesperson  licensure. It introduces concepts of property type, various  interests in real estate and how they are held, property description,  agency, real estate mathematics, property valuation, finance, settlement  computations, contract law, real estate finance, transfer of  title and taxation. It also presents details of Maryland real estate  license law and relevant sections of real property and other statutes  that affect the delivery of real estate brokerage services dealing with  agency, property disclosure, fair housing, real estate ethics, and  environmental concerns. Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

RLS 203 Real Estate Finance and Investment. 3 Credits  Decision-making analysis for real estate investment based on both  the characteristics of the investment property and the availability  and cost of funds appropriate for the project. Cash-flow forecasting,  arranging financing, creative financing, tax implications and  timing of disposal of property. Uses spreadsheets and financial  calculators. Prerequisites: Reading and arithmetic proficiency.

 

RLS 291-293 Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits

 

Residential Property Management (RPM) 

Business Management Department 

Temporary Services Building TO, Room 115 

301-322-0080

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RPM 101 Introduction to Residential Property Management 3 Credits  This course is designed to prepare students to manage multifamily  properties. The management of rental property (apartments)  is emphasized, but common interest realty associations  (CIRA) and other residential property (manufactured and senior  housing, single family homes) are also covered. Course topics  include: forms and goals of ownership, leasing, human resource  management, property operations, resident policies, marketing,  budgeting and planning, legal and risk management, and government  regulations. Prepares students for entry-level positions  as leasing consultants or assistant property managers, as well as  for further professional training and certification. Prerequisites:  Reading, English and mathematics proficiency.

 

RPM 102 Maintenance for Residential Property Management 3 Credits  Designed to prepare students to develop and implement maintenance  systems for residential properties. Course topics include:  the property manager’s role in maintenance; conducting inspections;  developing and scheduling maintenance programs; budgeting  for maintenance; staffing and contracting; energy management;  customer service; government codes and regulations; and,  safety and security. Prerequisite: RPM 101.

 

Sociology (SOC) 

Anthropology, Sociology and Economics Department 

Marlboro Hall, Room 2054 

301-322-0525

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SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology. 3 Credits SS  Survey of sociological concepts and their application to socialization,  social organizations and social change. Prerequisite: Reading  proficiency. (Honors version available.)

 

SOC 102 Marriage and Family. 3 Credits  Survey of modern marriage and family issues and related sociological  trends in America. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or ANT 103.

 

SOC 153 Law Enforcement and the Community 3 Credits CD  A study of the relationship between police and the community  with recommendations for ways of working together to reduce  crime. Emphasis is placed on policing in a culturally diverse  society. (Credit may not be received for both SOC 153 and  CJT 153.) Prerequisite: Reading proficiency.

 

SOC 201 Social Problems. 3 Credits SS  Review of problems facing American society and their sociological  implications, including theories of social deviance and social  disorganization. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or POS 101 (Honors  version available.)

 

SOC 203 Criminology. 3 Credits  Social and psychological concepts of criminal behavior and the  chronic offender. Prerequisite: SOC 101, PSY 101, or POS 101.

 

SOC 209 The Sociology of Minorities. 3 Credits CD  Outlines the establishment, maintenance, and breakdown of  dominance processes between ethnic, racial and religious groups  with emphasis on cross-cultural and cross-national patterns.  Prerequisite: ANT 103 or POS 101 or SOC 101 or PSY 101.

 

SOC 240 Introduction to Public Health and Health Care Policy. 3 Credits  An interdisciplinary course taught by leaders in the field focusing  on the many areas contributing to public health and health policy.  The intent is to heighten awareness of learners as both citizens  and voters in understanding the importance of public health and  health care policy development in the United States. Site visits to  local and state health departments and government agencies will  be included. Prerequisites: Reading proficiency and EGL 101.

 

SOC 289H Honors Colloquium in Sociology. 3 Credits  This Honors colloquium will examine special topics in the field  of sociology and its relevance across disciplinary perspectives.  The issues to be addressed in each colloquium will vary from  semester to semester. These courses are designed for students in  the Honors Program, but are open to others with the approval of  the honors coordinator or the instructor. Prerequisites: Reading  proficiency and permission of instructor or honors coordinator.

 

SOC 291–293 Cooperative Education. 1–3 Credits

SOC 291–293 Cooperative Education. 1–3 Credits

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301 Largo Rd., Largo, Maryland 20774-2199 USA

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